World Literature

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“Each poem reaches a moment when the mood changes, a moment of epiphany that jolts the reader out of his comfort zone and the everyday shimmers slightly as perspectives shift.”

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“. . . the entire poetic oeuvre of Israeli poet, feminist, and peace activist Dahlia Ravikovitch . . .”

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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen meets Young X-Men . . .”

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Skinny, by Diana Spechler is as divine, decadent, and sumptuous as a gourmet dessert.

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This collection of short nonfiction accounts is linked by a common thread of veracity and sincerity that has one reading through the whole gamut of emotions from humor to pathos.

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“A story is like a dance. It takes at least two people to make it come to life, the one who does the telling and the one who does the listening.”

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Told in blank verse, this story of the early pirates touches on a universal theme of children growing up without adequate adult role models.

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Robert Olen Butler, best known for A Good Scent From a Strange Mountain, his 1993 Pulitzer-Prize winning collection of short stories, has been turning out first-rate fiction for three deca

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Suspensful, spectacular, and searing are not adjectives one would use to describe The Calligrapher’s Secret. Intriguing, intelligent, and multifaceted are far more accurate to convey what

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If Specters were as good as its opening line “The valley was full of ghosts” it could have been intriguing, but it is not.

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Sherrilyn Kenyon is a prolific writer of a number of paranormal series. Infinity: Chronicles of Nick, a teen novel, is the first in a series for young adults.

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Every once in a while, a book comes along that is so creatively out-of-the box that the reader isn’t quite sure what he holds in his hands.

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The subtitle of this collection, Stories from a Village, is slightly misleading, for while some are set in the fictional Basque village of Obaba many of them are not.

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In his newest novel, Crimes of the Father, Booker Prize-winner Thomas Keneally succeeds in the seemingly impossible task of burrowing deeply into the mindset of a pedophilic Catholic pries

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