International Settings

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The year is 1921, and the place is Bombay, India.

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Nine chapters into a crime novel by an author you might not have heard of before, a guy is driving home in the early morning from his job at a gas station out on the highway.

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“Step back a moment into history as a contemporary detective investigates a death perhaps occurring two centuries before . . .”

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“a terrifying look into the life of a police officer more personally involved in a case than she’d like to be”

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“Dark Echoes of the Past is a literary treat for fans of noir . . .”

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The election of Donald Trump as America’s president has shed new light on something called the “deep state.” This term, which was first widely used in the case of the Republic of Turkey, specifical

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“A thoroughly captivating suspense-filled read that will not disappoint any devoted thriller enthusiast.” 

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“If anyone has ever wondered how the drug trade works and what lawyers think as they represent drug dealers in court, this novel gives a good, if fictional, idea.”

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“the most frightening book to be published this year . . . Lizzie Borden . . . reminds one that the scariest monster is always a human one.”

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When three American GIs stationed in South Korea during the 1970s go missing, Army Criminal Investigation Division Sergeants George Sueño and Ernie Bascom hear rumors that their disappearances are

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“A white-knuckle adventure from the start, . . . thoroughly entertaining historical mystery page-turner . . . filled with bountiful amounts of action and adventure.”

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"an entertaining, engaging crime novel."

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“Glass Houses is a Triple Crown winner for plot, characterization, and setting. . . .

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“an extraordinary debut novel filled with unique characters and heart-pumping situations we never see coming.”

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“a graphic portrayal of a dirty, ugly slice of life . . . Recommended for anyone seeking to know more about the drug cartels that threaten society.”

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Mystery writer Agatha Christie disappears for 11 days in 1926, but seldom speaks about it and omits entirely any mention of it in her autobiography.

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Tomoyuki Hoshino, born 1965, is one of Japan’s more compelling younger writers, but he remains virtually unknown abroad.

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Lars Martin Johansson, retired head of the Swedish National Criminal Police, stops at a well-known hotdog kiosk for a quick bite to eat before heading home.

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“a psychological puzzle box that ultimately explores multiple levels of illicit passions.”

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“Truth . . . the one thing people will do anything to hide . . . because the truth will always come out in the end.”

A killer is stalking the women of Göteborg.

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The Lost Boy is a complex and brilliant novel, but is one of Lackberg’s darkest stories.”

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Eloquent, almost poetic descriptive narrative combines with frequent brutal prose to create a story both compelling and stomach-churning set in beautiful, but often politically corrupt Kyrgyzstan.

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“one comes away with a sense of futility and a loss of sleep from reading on to the bitter end.”

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Packed with rim-shot snappy dialogue and sharply barbed observations, David Freed’s Hot Start is a tasty romp featuring irascible and the uber-jaded Cordell Logan.

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