Horror

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If you’ve ever flown, then you’ll know the fear that can sometimes come with the experience; the unexpected turbulence, unforeseen weather events, the vertigo, the constant possibility that somethi

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Charlie Husk is not like other boys. Charlie grew up in the deep, dark woods of rural New Hampshire. He was 28 when he first used a cell phone, surfed the Internet, and smoked a joint.

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Zombies never, ever die. Nobody knows that fact better than John Russo, the man who penned the screenplay for the first modern zombie flick, 1968’s Night of the Living Dead.

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“Baby Teeth is a very satisfying read. More psychological thriller than horror, it’s a finely crafted exploration of the breakdown of the family unit . .

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“. . . begins with a good premise that dissolves into a disappointment . . .”

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“this story is full evidence that ghosties and ghoulies inhabit places other than the United States and Transylvania.”

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“a delightful fairy tale for adults, a fable set in Victorian Canada with an enjoyable cast of characters, and quite probably a moral or two hidden somewhere within its pages.”

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With his Autumn and Hater series, British horror/thriller author David Moody reinvented the zombie. With One of Us Will Be Dead by Morning (St.

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“Masterfully written and sure to supply plenty of creepy-crawlies, The Outsider by Stephen King once again hits the ball out of the park.” 

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“a subdued chiller relating how death brings a circle of events to a halt, only to begin once more when a spirit regains admittance into the living world.”

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“a breathless, oxygen-deprived framework intensifying the terror of the written word”

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“A different kind of detective story, The Spirit Photographer is an American gothic novel set in a time of post-war turmoil.”

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It is said that imitation is the purest form of flattery. Be that true, the question becomes what hold does a feeble imitation of a literary classic have on flattery.

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“an enthralling account that stands out from the pack of environmental literature.” 

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“A story the reader will select with a wriggle of delight and a frisson of dread.”

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“an offbeat, occasionally absurd but haunting tale of life, death, heartbreak, and ultimately, redemption . . .”

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The story continues . . . of Xanther and her pet cat. The Familiar, Volume 4: Hades, by Mark Z.

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“It is no accident that J. R. Ward’s series are beloved. She is a master writer.”

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If Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, first published in 1818, is indeed a novel more talked about than read, as Sir Christopher Frayling suggests in Frankenstein: The First Two Hundred Year

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“a delightful little tale, appropriate for telling when the lights are low and a flickering fire casts shadows over the Christmas tree.”

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“a literary tour-de-force of the supernatural genre, at the same time disturbing, frightening, and fascinating.”

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The Twilight Pariah is the kind of story that makes the goosebumps rise.”

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“this hardcover graphic novel collection will delight any fan of epic fantasy, and be a welcome addition gracing the shelves of the aficionado’s library.”

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“a danger-fraught and compelling thriller with a world-threatening premise . . .”

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“The Dark Net is a fun romp through the blackest recesses of contemporary tech.”

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