Urban Life

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Stephanie Gangi’s magnificent second novel, Carry the Dog, captures the paralysis of the daily world so well that it’s a genuine surprise to realize that it’s set before the pandemic.

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“Jo Hamya’s highly impressive, smart, and sophisticated debut novel Three Rooms is a contemporary response to Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own.”

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Muñoz Molina writes in the first person about his own life.

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Life is full of contradictions and paradoxes, and the course on which one sets out almost always leads to an unintended destination, lessons that are on full display in Joshua Henkin’s new novel

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“beautifully written. Thomson is a master of description, often erotic description.”

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“a landmark in South African crime fiction.”

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“While unpolished in places, Open Water is the work of a talented and promising young writer.”

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Miss Iceland is a beautiful novel about artistic aspiration and friendship. The storytelling sparkles . . .”

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“In The Night Fire Michael Connelly delivers the goods once again, extending his legacy as quite simply the best author of police procedurals in the business.”

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“A classic story of good versus evil, in which evil, though seemingly overcome, may simply lie dormant until it’s strong enough to strike from a different source.”

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The stories in Ha Seong-Nan’s Flowers of Mold are an acquired taste. Fortunately, taste for them can be developed awfully fast.

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A beautifully written novel, translated from the Italian, with a heartwarming story against a backcloth of misery and degradation, about a priest and a gang of boys and one of the boy’s sister, 16-

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“‘You have to forget the past so that you can live the future,’ a Syrian immigrant tells Jonas, revealing Lichtman’s key for Jonas to move forward through his pain.”

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“There’s no need to tell an abbreviation of Walter Mosley’s story here. If the reader wants a complicated and well-told mystery, it’s here.

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“Kate Christensen’s insights into the psyche of a middle-aged banished husband are astonishing.”