Diane Lechleitner

Diane Lechleitner is a visual artist, poet, and author. Her novel, Faron Goss, is the Gold Winner of The Foreword Reviews Indies Award for General Fiction.

Other awards for Faron Goss are: The National Indie Excellence Award, Finalist; Notable Book/Shelf Unbound Best Indie Book Competition; Royal Dragonfly Book Award, Honorable Mention; Independent Publisher Book Awards, Medalist; American Book Fest/American Fiction Awards, Finalist; Eric Hoffer da Vinci Eye Award, Finalist; and a nomination for the Indie Next List.

Ms. Lechleitner earned her BFA at Pratt Institute and MFA at Purchase College. She printed etchings for Salvador Dali, Peter Max, and other artists. Her artwork has been selected for exhibitions, including the Print Center in Philadelphia, and a solo show at The Dade College Gallery in Miami, where her work remains in the permanent collection. She is the Winner of an Exxon Award for Printmaking and the recipient of several Artist-in-Residence Fellowships, including The Virginia Center for the Arts and the Ragdale Foundation.

Books by Diane Lechleitner

Book Reviews by Diane Lechleitner

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Bear is a dark tale, redeemed by good writing.”

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“an enchanting, tenacious story of loss and resilience, and a vivid reminder of the fragility of our lives and environment and all the ways they are connected.”

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Crow Talk is a many-layered story of grief and healing. Of lessons learned from solitude and nature.”

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“a clever and entertaining novel that readers of the series will likely enjoy.”

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World War I France is the setting for Miss Morgan’s Book Brigade, a work of historical fiction written by Janet Skeslien Charles.

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Honey is a bittersweet concoction of loveliness, regret, hope, growing old, second chances, mortality, loneliness, inescapable familial bonds, long-nurtured grudges, and final rec

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Jenny Quinn and her husband Bernard have settled into retirement in the peaceful small English village of Kittlesham, where Jenny immerses herself in her love of baking and the comfort of old famil

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“Wherever he takes you—to the steamy summers of the Deep South, to dingy bars and squalid dwellings, or to fragrant cherry orchards by a lake near Bigfork—Burke makes everything come to lif

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“A dark read, Twenty-Seven Minutes succeeds in its dreariness in a satisfying way.”

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“Amanda Peters writes with beautiful simplicity. What a joy to read fiction that isn’t cluttered with unnecessary twists and turns and verbiage.”

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A Place to Land is an engaging book with enough intrigue . . . to stand alone and keep you guessing . . .”