Literary Fiction

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It’s confusing enough to be adopted. To be thrust from abject poverty in one of the poorest favelas in São Paulo into one of the richest families in the country, even more so.

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Oh, to be a 19th century English aristocrat compelled to take a languorous journey by coach—ship—camel to the mysteries of Egypt, where upon a sturdy square-sailed dahabieh, doting servants attend

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Nora MacKenzie lost everything.

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Pop Quiz: The title, Isle of Dreams, refers to:

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There exists a fascination with Emily Dickinson, a genius in a tiny bedroom scribbling poems that would become legendary. A mythological recluse writing about life, but not participating in it.

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Even the most enthusiastic admirers of the late Roberto Bolaño must wonder sometimes if there is really a case for posthumously publishing everything that he ever wrote.

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Here is a Southern literary novel that takes the reader back to 1920 and the back hills of the Carolina highlands where horses are still the main means of travel.

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The good thing about anthologies is that it gives readers an opportunity for quick reads, without a lot of the flowery and extraneous prose that often bogs down other novels.

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Mason’s in a bit of a bind, though he might not admit it to you.

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Dr. Zhivago is a big book, physically and in terms of its themes, multi-stranded storylines and historical backdrop.

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The hardscrabble life of Appalachia is well-explored territory, mapped with notable success most recently by the likes of Tony Earley and Ron Rash.

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The promotional materials that accompanied my review copy of James Franco’s debut fiction collection, Palo Alto, set the bar impossibly high for the 30-something actor-turned-writer.

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In the Hebrew edition of Yael Hedaya’s novel Eden the second of three chapters named for the character Dafna begins with the following paragraph:

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In Grim Reaper: End of Days, Steve Alten offers up an ambitious tale of a hero’s journey through Hell.

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Charles Simic has been around for along time and has seen a great deal. He was born in Belgrade in 1938 and his early years were spent, with his family, as displaced people in war-torn Europe.

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Motherlode, the fictional dusty California gold-rush town whose evolution Mary Volmer portrays so charmingly in her debut novel, is a character of its own—a gawky preteen of a sort, a formerly happ

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If one doesn’t make the comparison of the author’s debut effort to George Orwell’s novel, 1984, then there’s been a huge disconnect somewhere.  Veracity is a futuristic tale of a gove

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The Trials of Zion challenges the imagination of the most avid aficionado of courtroom drama and intrigue, as Alan Dershowitz expertly intertwines contemporary views of Middle Eastern trad

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British police officer Frankford Lucas has dreamed about the Quiet Road ever since childhood.

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Writers for young people are often encouraged to pen their novels at a level no higher than high school and then jettison directly to adult books if desired.

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Reading the work of a truly talented author is a well-savored delight for a book lover. When it comes to the art of writing, C. W. Gortner’s name can be added to the list of master craftsmen.

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In the celebrity crazed culture we currently live in, Carl Hiaasen’s newest novel, Star Island, fits right in.

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Reading Russian Winter is like savoring a ripe August plum. The first bite is a lovely surprise—sweet on the tongue.

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Every once in a while, a book comes along that is so creatively out-of-the box that the reader isn’t quite sure what he holds in his hands.

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Losing Camille is a good example of what it is to be a talented writer. Paul Kilgore sensitively explores the intricacies of everyday America in this diverse assortment of tales.

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