Families

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“Be prepared to be welcomed by the loving, lively, and amusing Hurlihy family in Must Love Dogs: Lucky Enough, as with previous novels in

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“A desperate, gritty story set against a backdrop of hard knocks and hard times, Donna Everhart’s historically researched The Saints of Swallow Hill is the triumphant story of unli

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“a kind of master class in voice . . . the world of literature is much richer now that Longing and Other Stories is available for English readers.”

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“The stark and concise portrayal of the pandemic gives food for thought about what exactly matters most in one's life.”

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Gracie Tellman, happily married and the mother of three young children, is shocked when Millie Foster, the daughter of her deceased best friend, shows up at her house.

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“. . . thought-provoking, hope-filled, and inspirational.”

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The Hidden Child raises the disturbing question: How many of these fictitious people would have cheered Hitler on?”

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That Jonathan Franzen has large ambitions as an author is not news. Nor is it news that his success has been large.

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How many people do not live with some regret or the desire to have done things differently? It is 1995, and 15-year-old Maggie Dawes believes she lives in the shadow of her older sister, Morgan, wh

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“Beard’s writing brings the premise of each chapter to life, allowing the reader to become the protagonist of the moment, experiencing the situation in which she finds herself.”

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“Strout, once again, demonstrates that she certainly knows human nature.”

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“There’s a rawness to [the story], and a realness to the writing, that makes Miriam Toews a master of the novel. Every book of hers is magic.

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“A tour de force about failure and success, connection and isolation, about how we shape our lives by the stories we tell about them, and, ultimately, how stories redeem us.”

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“this compulsively readable novel of historical fiction is about three courageous women trying to triumph over the forces of history and forced to make life-altering choices.”

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“one tightly connected braid of liberty/imprisonment in forms that are political, physical, societal, emotional, and psychological.

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Life is full of contradictions and paradoxes, and the course on which one sets out almost always leads to an unintended destination, lessons that are on full display in Joshua Henkin’s new novel

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The Ocean in Winter is a compelling, well-written debut . . .”

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The premise of this novel about a couple in their fifties, who make a pact with each other to off themselves on their 80th birthday, is a study of themes that author Lionel Shriver investigates in

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“Matthew Clark Davison’s Doubting Thomas is an absorbing story of a gay man who finally learns to love.”

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In the summer of 1981 came the New York Times’ article about “Forty-one homosexuals turning up in emergency rooms with a spectrum of mysterious and lethal symptoms.” Forty years later ther

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Complex and moving, this read will get one thinking.”

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“If you have two days that you’re not using for anything in particular—well, even if you have plans, put them away, pick up this book—they will be two days well spent.”

Of Women and Salt is a beautifully written novel that turns like a kaleidoscope in the light, illuminating the blurry delineation of who is an insider and who an outsider.”

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Life is stagnant for 44-year-old Alice Holtzman.

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Lynette’s alarm goes off at 3:15 a.m. She is 30 years old. She wears ten-year-old sweats and wool socks to bed. Her room’s warmth depends on a portable heater; it doesn’t work very well.

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