Families

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This book, final volume of a trilogy, has been hailed as “hilarious” and “comedic” and similar terms.

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“a satisfying summer read.”

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“This novel’s greatest strength is the simplicity of its message: two boys who grew up in such different worlds playing soccer in the backyard and sneaking off to eat raspas offer us a grea

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If you’ve read Mary Miller’s captivating debut, The Last Days of California—an eccentrically peopled coming-of-age tale—you might be expecting something similar from her second novel,

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Many little girls love parties, and in 1988 Zoe O'Flaherty, age five, is about to enter kindergarten.

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Katie Ellis, who is divorcing her cheating husband Eric, is shocked when he brings his "friend" to the lawyer's office.

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Feel-good stories abound, but this one offers a fresh and creative context: crop circles.

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Divorce attorney Leigh Huyett believed she had it all: a loving second husband, a mixed family consisting of her 20-year-old twin sons and her delightful 14-year-old daughter Chrissy.

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“In American Duchess the reader is afforded a remarkable and realistic portrait of a life well-lived in spite of and often in opposition to societal expectations.

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The first page of When All Is Said is an advertisement from a Thomas Dollard for an “Edward VIII Gold Sovereign Coin, 1936. Willing to pay top price.”

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Englander finds fascinating ways to explore another of his great recurring themes: the points at which modernity and tradition may fruitfully, if uncomfortably—and always

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“The Quintland Sisters transports the reader to another time period . . .

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“Death Is Hard Work is a short book, but one learns more detail of the life of war than from a hundred newspaper and TV reports.

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“The novel may be cool as it opens, but the ending is white hot. Both the unnamed family and the anonymous migrant children succeed as individual characters.

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“a smart, entertaining and highly readable novel, one that should appeal to a diverse audience.”

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“Gornick has given her readers a tale suffused with pathos and moral imperative, which tugs kindly and powerfully at our hearts.”

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“What makes this novel a delight is the very relatable tale of a father struggling to know and love his daughter, to protect her from harm while allowing her to make her own choices and ful

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Crystal Hannah Kim’s celebrated debut novel can either be read as a tragic love story, in the tradition of Romeo and Juliet, or as a feminist parable of a woman victimized by the Korean wa

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Half of What You Hear is a character driven, dishy, gossipy, fun read . . .”

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It's every parent's nightmare to discover their child has gone missing, but more heartrending is entrusting your youngster to a friend only to learn they've either been abducted or run away.

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“an insightful and smart look at Pakistani culture and the ways in which women are viewed and how they view themselves. . . .

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"quite a nicely baked short yarn, rather than a novel, but written a bit like a soufflé, rising in the oven but when eaten there isn’t that much substance."

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“For such an unabashedly polemical first novel, The Patricide of George Benjamin Hill works surprising well, due in large measure to the unremitting intensity of Charlesworth’s wri

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"If [Madhuri Vijay] goes on like this she will enter the first rank along with Arundhati Roy, Anita Desai, Vikram Seth, and half a dozen others. We will see much more of her."

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“Shahla Ujayli uses Joumane’s thoughts as a frame in which to tell stories that are rich in their historical perspective of the region and the people who populate it.

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