Families

Reviewed by: 

“Gods Without Men is a handful of desert sand in which each grain has its own unique history, provenance, and abrasion pattern. Mr.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . the question, the one that has to do with the collected stories in questions, is: Is What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank: Stories worthy of the hoopla?

Reviewed by: 

“The Twoweeks is written by a veteran author who is not trying to dazzle with literary showmanship but with intimate storytelling.”

Reviewed by: 

“Richard Paul Evans is a masterful writer who gets to the heart of friendship, family relationships, betrayal, and acceptance, making Lost December a heartfelt tale that is sure to

Reviewed by: 

“Delightfully entertaining with a killing sense of humor, Practical Jean: A Novel is worthy contender for Book of The Year. You’ll love it to death.”

Reviewed by: 

“The subject matter of Call Me When You Land might seem dark and depressing, but it’s not. It’s funny and human and real.

Reviewed by: 

“Mr. Frazier’s writing is so fine it needs to be savored. These people are as unique as all human beings are; not one of them can be wholly admired or detested.

Reviewed by: 

“But, oh, there is fun to be had in The Goddess of Vengeance. Fun aplenty. . . . No one will ever accuse Jackie Collins of writing literature. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Toward the end of the novel there is a gutsy shift in narrative tone that lends the ending a sense of closure.

Reviewed by: 

“In Last Man in Tower, it is immediately apparent that author Adiga’s writing has matured.

Reviewed by: 

“The Family Fang is the sort of perfectly idiosyncratic thing that comes along only ever so often. . . . This book should succeed spectacularly. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“This family is so real, so understandable, so in need of comfort each in their own way, that we want to embrace them in their grief, applaud their reconciliations, and learn from their lov

Reviewed by: 

“I Knew You’d Be Lovely is an impressive offering, from a strong new voice, of stories about life’s desperation.”

Reviewed by: 

“Kate Christensen’s insights into the psyche of a middle-aged banished husband are astonishing.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Here we are in the time of our aging baby-boomers.

Reviewed by: 

Every town has an ”it” girl: The one that shines just a little too brightly, lives life a little too fully, and yet still manages to draw the attention of everyone.

Reviewed by: 

Anna, Portia, and Emery return home after their mother, Louise, has a massive heart attack.

Reviewed by: 

How many wonder what their life would be like if they chose a different path? This is the crux of Ellen Meister’s riveting novel, The Other Life.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

A ten-spread (20 page) board book with a nice puffy cover, All Kinds of Kisses explores, well, all kinds of kisses.

Reviewed by: 

“The life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.”
—Thomas Hobbes, English political philosopher (1588-–1679), The Leviathan

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

This is a novel that finishes well. That being said, the first half of the novel is a muddy bog.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

The hardscrabble life of Appalachia is well-explored territory, mapped with notable success most recently by the likes of Tony Earley and Ron Rash.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Sometime in the early 1800s, somewhere in not-so-merry old England, doddering old Lord Upton lost his mind.

Pages