Military History & Affairs

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

As with many other subjects, one can find a surfeit of publications on the so-called Longest Day—D-Day—and its attendant Normandy campaign.

Reviewed by: 

“The book concludes with a stark assessment of China’s coupling of its immense economic power to the country’s long-term goals of achieving hegemony in Asia and then becoming the premier wo

Reviewed by: 

As the subtitle makes clear, this densely written book compares four wars, starting with World War II, and attempts to explain why the "strategic architecture," the author's term for the combinatio

Reviewed by: 

“the book reads almost like a Tom Clancy thriller, with political intrigue, international machinations, and suspense keeping the pages turning even if the reader is already basically famili

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“For students of history, and also for casual readers who simply enjoy learning new and unusual aspects of history, this book is a real gem.

Reviewed by: 

“Hastings has written the best one-volume history on this war in a generation . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“Engaging, gorgeous, and thought provoking, this massive tome is a truly landmark example of the synergy between military history and the visual arts.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Should one be inclined to search, there is a plethora of titles published on this subject since the end of World War II.

Reviewed by: 

In the 21st century, Americans take for granted that U.S. presidents exercise broad war-making powers. U.S.

Reviewed by: 

Carl von Clausewitz is best known for his magnum opus, On War, which has long been considered the standard for Western thought on war and strategy.  Although generations of graduate and wa

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Many Americans were shocked last year to watch neo-Nazis marching and chanting racist profanity in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The Order of the Day is smug, self-important, and pedestrian history.”

Reviewed by: 

"A Fierce Glory offers spectacle over detail to the benefit of understanding."

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

"This very thick book makes a fast entertaining read that illuminates facts about the times on almost every page.

Reviewed by: 

“Wars are not won by evacuations,” remarked Winston Churchill after 338,226 British and French soldiers were safely transferred from the beaches at Dunkirk to England in late May-early June 1940.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“a tale of bravery, courage, and sacrifice . . .”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

John Hendrix tells a very complicated story in tracing Dietrich Bonhoeffer's journey of faith in Nazi Germany. The graphic format serves him well as he intersperses dense text passages with art.

Reviewed by: 

It has been asked before, regarding topics which have previously received considerable attention from the publishing world: Is it really necessary for another book on this subject?

Reviewed by: 

“long overdue update to a tragic and avoidable Allied debacle, which continues to offer stark lessons on the dangers of hubris and substituting optimism for solid operational planning.”

Reviewed by: 

In the 2018 edition of Hezbollah, first published in 2007, Boston University professor Augustus Richard Norton adds new chapters on the complex dynamics of the Syrian war involving the Uni

Reviewed by: 

“not a lot of books that can be said to change the historiography of events, but this stands as one of them . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

When the first major contingent of conventional U.S.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In medieval times, uncharted areas on maps were often marked “Here there be dragons,” but there are no records of what dragons may have been encountered, because there were no survivors to tell the

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“These are the times that try men’s souls,” wrote Thomas Paine, and his pamphlet is as instructive today as it was in 1776.

Reviewed by: 

In 1346 Edward of Woodstock commanded the frontline at the Battle of Crécy, his father King Edward III of England, intentionally left him unsupported to win the battle, so he could “earn his spurs”

Pages