European

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Venice, renown the world over for its beauty and riches, becomes the setting for Gabrielle Wittkop's Murder Most Serene.

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“an effervescent book, comprised of two equally well-rounded stories . . .”

“if you really care about something in life, do whatever it takes not to lose it.”

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With age usually comes wisdom, and when waxing nostalgic, one usually sees the significance of youthful events in a new and understanding light.

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“many of the stories have the feel of being a novel in gestation.”

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a fascinating peek into the genesis of Austria's controversial literary figure.”

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The new English translation of Patrick Modiano’s 2003 novel Paris Nocturne defies categorization.

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Michel Houellebecq, the enfant terrible of French letters, is no longer an enfant and Submission is far from terrible, but his latest novel is, as usual, an even

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"Mirbeau's novel offers trenchant satire that will endure."

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charming and vivid if erratic and sometimes offal.”

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“the effort of reading The Wall will enlarge our understanding [of the Holocaust and its aftermath].”

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“The Story of My Purity is a frustrating novel—entertaining enough . . . yet ultimately unconvincing.”

“. . . you’ll get a kick out of this one.”

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The Canvas is an engaging read guardedly recommended to psychological mystery enthusiasts . . .”

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“. . . recommended to Mr. Kiš’ admirers as well as to all readers of Eastern European literature in translation and of short form fiction.”

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Stieg Larsson may have believed Sweden was infected with sinister conspiracies, but Nikanor Teratologen fears the evildoers probably live openly right next door.

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“Péter Nadás may infuriate readers accustomed to a Tolstoyan resolution of a series of interrelated stories and characters and times and settings.

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“At barely more than 100 small (four and a half by seven inch) pages in Andrew Bromfield’s excellent English translation The Hall of the Singing Caryatids succeeds both as a novell

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“Sorry has all the ingredients to make it a compulsive read. It’s slick, chock full of twists and turns, and dripping with narrative thrust and intrigue. . . .

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“On the credit side, Mr. Drvenkar’s narrative and dialogue are strong and move each section of the story along. He selects his words with care . . .

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“Each poem reaches a moment when the mood changes, a moment of epiphany that jolts the reader out of his comfort zone and the everyday shimmers slightly as perspectives shift.”

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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen meets Young X-Men . . .”

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Suspensful, spectacular, and searing are not adjectives one would use to describe The Calligrapher’s Secret. Intriguing, intelligent, and multifaceted are far more accurate to convey what

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