Women’s Fiction

Reviewed by: 

“Brilliantly conceived. . . . There are court intrigues, whispered rumors, a clever subplot about the power of painting, what it reveals as well as what it hides . . .

Reviewed by: 

“an intellectually engaging and psychologically probing novel about a family returning from a dark place to a better one.”

Reviewed by: 

To understand and appreciate this novel, you need to move past any aversion you might have to the idea of female killers. Women as paid assassins, murderers for hire . . .

Reviewed by: 

“McCall Smith is an author who sees his characters and their world, fully and tenderly. And that makes for a book that is as comforting to sink into as well-worn armchair.”

Reviewed by: 

Louisa Treger opens her historical novel about the life of intrepid reporter Nellie Bly in 1887 as she arrives on Blackwell Island, home of the notorious women’s insane asylum.

Reviewed by: 

“a quick read . . . easily digested . .  .”

Reviewed by: 

“lyrical beauty of Manfredi’s prose . . . at its heart, The Empire of Dirt is a rich puzzle impossible to resist.”

Reviewed by: 

“This is a very funny, easy to read novel that has an edge thanks to its main character’s charade.”

Reviewed by: 

“tightly crafted women’s fiction, with a sensitive look at love, conscience, and loyalty.”

Reviewed by: 

C. J. Carey’s novel, Widowland, couldn’t be more chilling—or dystopian—given the frightening political landscape confronting women in America and elsewhere.

Reviewed by: 

The writing is so smooth and consistent, and the narrative unfolds so steadily, it’s hard to look up from.”

Reviewed by: 

It is April 1943, and World War II is raging throughout Europe. In Washington, D.C., Ava Harper is working as a librarian at a job she loves in the Rare Book Room at the Library of Congress.

Reviewed by: 

Nineteen-year-old Avery helps her mother give birth to a baby boy who dies within ten minutes. While her female siblings care for their mother, Avery is given the task of burying the child.

Reviewed by: 

“a journey into the heart and longing of a spirited woman discovering her identity outside societal expectations, her search for personal freedom, her courageousness, and her empathy.”

Reviewed by: 

Nothing is more heartbreaking and disturbing than war.

Reviewed by: 

“leaves the reader with a profound sense of satisfaction.”

Reviewed by: 

When one thinks about beach reads, Elin Hilderbrand inevitably comes to mind as the author of many satisfying novels that take the reader to Nantucket's historic and well-known island.

Reviewed by: 

Tracy Flick Can’t Win is a deeply humanist work by a master of observation.”

Reviewed by: 

There are summer beach reads and then there are summer European beach reads.

Reviewed by: 

What could be more fun and exciting than being single and having a thriving business located right on the California waterfront?

Reviewed by: 

The Foundling touches on important issues like women’s autonomy, racism, classism, and anti-Semitism, as well as other social justice issues.”

Reviewed by: 

Dealing with a terminal illness is grueling, not just for the one who is ill but also for their loved ones.

Reviewed by: 

Holding Her Breath is a generational story written in descriptive language with steady pacing. . . .

Reviewed by: 

Maria Adelman’s How to Be Eaten has a fabulous premise—in modern day New York, five women gather for a trauma support group, each of them a modern reimagining of a fairy tale heroine.

Pages