Women’s Fiction

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“the underlying message of the book is that no matter how well loved and well supported you are, bad things can happen that aren’t your fault, and they can mess you up no matter what you do

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“Beatriz Williams deftly fits together the characters, stories, and themes that the narrative services into a cohesive whole.

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“two generations come to understand each other and find the true meaning of family.”

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“a powerful, high octane, suspenseful read.”

What does someone need to successfully disappear without a trace?

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It is the summer of 1993 and 23-year-old Mallory Blessing is desperate to get away from her Baltimore childhood home.

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Readers will find Zadie Smith’s short story collection a mixed bag with a few interesting bits and pieces, and a few good short works.

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“Traveling Kate’s journey with her offers insightful experience many readers will relate to, expressed through some delightfully snappy prose.”

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The Gordons of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, spend every summer at the century-old saltbox passed down from Ed Gordon's grandparents.

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You spend the night cuddling with your husband and wake up the next morning to find him gone having left a note saying, "Lily, I can't do this anymore. You deserve more than what I can give you.

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“the unique personalities of the complex characters along with a bit of mystery make this an involving read.

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Lane Meckler is a columnist known as “Ask Roxie” in which she gives advice to help people online with problems.

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Sarah Conley Hawkins, a big-shot reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, is offered a lucrative position with "Intelligentsia," an investigative news service in Washington, D.C.

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How many older women regret not doing things they've wanted to do in life?

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“Meyerson does an admirable job of answering the question she posed to herself, and by the end of the story, ties up all the loose ends that she tossed out to the reader from the beginning.

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Many of today's families are blended with step-siblings and half-siblings.

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This short story collection by Newbery Award-winner Madeleine L’Engle, published posthumously by her granddaughter, is aimed more at L’Engle scholars and devoted fans than recreational readers fami

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The Book of Longings is well named, well inspired, and well imagined—a superlative effort from a writer at the top of her game.”

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“it’s the perennial conflict between motherhood and career, but not the way most readers might expect.”

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Professor Frank Hobbs never thought he'd find love, that is until he met Maggie. Working on his Ph.D.

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Sin eaters are historically marginal figures, outcasts of Britain who ate bread from coffins to absolve the sins of the dead.

“Overall, this is a reasonably good story that could have been much stronger. . . . The ending ties everything together but feels too pat and maybe a little too cute.

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“a story of an obsessive friendship that is strong enough to survive death—and what happens in its aftermath.”

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“This debut novel is sure to raise one's hackles.”

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Olivia Harper lives and works in Seattle, putting in grueling hours at her job as well as on her startup website business, Harper Media.

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The format of this story is a familiar one in character-driven novels: multiple people gathering in an isolated place removed from their daily lives, spilling their secrets and changing their relat

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