Working Women

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“pungent insights into people’s motivations, emotions, and relationships”

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World War I France is the setting for Miss Morgan’s Book Brigade, a work of historical fiction written by Janet Skeslien Charles.

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In a way, Xochitl González’s Anita de Monte Laughs Last is almost two novels in one, both great.

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Based on a true story, The Woman with No Name follows the trajectory of the woman who is recruited as Britain's first female sabotage agent during the German occupation of France in World

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“Frances Perkins was an important role model and social welfare advocate who deserves to be better known.”

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“In a business in which feminine beauty is what they’re selling, both Arden and Rubenstein eschewed those qualities society deemed feminine.”

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“a rich tapestry of a book . . .”

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“does a good job of evoking the post-Civil War era . . .”

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“Cruz has created an unforgettable character in Cara. And readers will feel like they’ve made a new, fascinating friend.”

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“a quick read . . . easily digested . .  .”

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It is April 1943, and World War II is raging throughout Europe. In Washington, D.C., Ava Harper is working as a librarian at a job she loves in the Rare Book Room at the Library of Congress.

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Kerri Maher’s The Paris Bookseller is a worthy homage to Sylvia Beach and a love letter to all bookstores, libr

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Eleutheria . . .

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Family Law is a compelling legal thriller told with a fresh take on Southern fiction.”

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“Each author tells the tale of a separate character, each in her own unique voice, somehow seamlessly meshing the four together and thus allowing the story to flow and blossom.

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“Despite coming in at just under 500 pages, If This Is Paradise, I Want My Money Back seems to go by in a flash.

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“But, oh, there is fun to be had in The Goddess of Vengeance. Fun aplenty. . . . No one will ever accuse Jackie Collins of writing literature. . . .