Literary Fiction

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Martyrdom Street, by Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet, is an interesting and informative book about life in Iran and America during the Revolution and after the Iran-Iraq War from about 1979 to 1993

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How to Read the Air finds Dinaw Mengestu building on many of the themes that made his debut novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, both a delight and a sorrow to read.

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Further Adventures in the Restless Universe is a small book, a mere one hundred pages. But what it lacks in size, it more than makes up for in literary content.

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Epitaph Road is the latest in a string of successful young adult novels by David Patneaude.

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Bloodroot stabs at the heart. Its sap drips blood red with beauty, and, if you use it right, poison.

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Halfway through Steve Martin’s third novel, An Object of Beauty, his anti-heroine Lacey Yeager discovers she may be implicated in a major art theft involving stolen works by Vermeer and Rembrandt T

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Patrick and Margaret had been together for two years. When Patrick had the opportunity to go to Kenya to study tropical diseases, he asked her to go with him.

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This is Benjamin Percy’s first novel following his successful short story collections Refresh, Refresh (Graywolf, 2007) and The Language of Elk (Carnegie Mellon, 2006).

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History seems to collide with the present and manifest itself physically in this novel. “Mountain Spirits” and even an occasional ghost also glide through the pages.

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When I first saw the name Meg Cabot, I immediately thought this was a new young adult book by the prolific author of such titles as The Princess Diaries series and the Allie Finkle’s Rules for Girl

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Outlaw is an apt title for this definitive collection of the works of Miguel Piñero.

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In his newest novel, Crimes of the Father, Booker Prize-winner Thomas Keneally succeeds in the seemingly impossible task of burrowing deeply into the mindset of a pedophilic Catholic pries

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