Literary Fiction

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The search for the truth can often be elusive. The truth itself can be devastating.

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 She did it!  She really did it!  Ms.

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 This is the final installment of the Last Round-Up trilogy that began in 1999 with A Star Called Henry and continued with 2004’s Oh, Play That Thing. Spanning nearly the

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 Erika Meyer sure found an unusual focal point for her novel Strangers in America.

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Shortly before his death, the comedian and social critic, George Carlin, decried the “pussification of the American male.” Carlin was complaining about the rise of materialistic, metro-sexual men i

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Maggie Pouncey is bringing back language, slow and careful language. It’s the type of language that began to disappear in the 1960s.

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Martyrdom Street, by Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet, is an interesting and informative book about life in Iran and America during the Revolution and after the Iran-Iraq War from about 1979 to 1993

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How to Read the Air finds Dinaw Mengestu building on many of the themes that made his debut novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, both a delight and a sorrow to read.

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Further Adventures in the Restless Universe is a small book, a mere one hundred pages. But what it lacks in size, it more than makes up for in literary content.

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Epitaph Road is the latest in a string of successful young adult novels by David Patneaude.

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Bloodroot stabs at the heart. Its sap drips blood red with beauty, and, if you use it right, poison.

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Halfway through Steve Martin’s third novel, An Object of Beauty, his anti-heroine Lacey Yeager discovers she may be implicated in a major art theft involving stolen works by Vermeer and Rembrandt T

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Patrick and Margaret had been together for two years. When Patrick had the opportunity to go to Kenya to study tropical diseases, he asked her to go with him.

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This is Benjamin Percy’s first novel following his successful short story collections Refresh, Refresh (Graywolf, 2007) and The Language of Elk (Carnegie Mellon, 2006).

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History seems to collide with the present and manifest itself physically in this novel. “Mountain Spirits” and even an occasional ghost also glide through the pages.

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When I first saw the name Meg Cabot, I immediately thought this was a new young adult book by the prolific author of such titles as The Princess Diaries series and the Allie Finkle’s Rules for Girl

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Outlaw is an apt title for this definitive collection of the works of Miguel Piñero.

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If one doesn’t make the comparison of the author’s debut effort to George Orwell’s novel, 1984, then there’s been a huge disconnect somewhere.  Veracity is a futuristic tale of a gove

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The Trials of Zion challenges the imagination of the most avid aficionado of courtroom drama and intrigue, as Alan Dershowitz expertly intertwines contemporary views of Middle Eastern trad

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British police officer Frankford Lucas has dreamed about the Quiet Road ever since childhood.

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Writers for young people are often encouraged to pen their novels at a level no higher than high school and then jettison directly to adult books if desired.

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Reading the work of a truly talented author is a well-savored delight for a book lover. When it comes to the art of writing, C. W. Gortner’s name can be added to the list of master craftsmen.

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In the celebrity crazed culture we currently live in, Carl Hiaasen’s newest novel, Star Island, fits right in.

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Reading Russian Winter is like savoring a ripe August plum. The first bite is a lovely surprise—sweet on the tongue.

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Every once in a while, a book comes along that is so creatively out-of-the box that the reader isn’t quite sure what he holds in his hands.

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