Literary Fiction

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Nora MacKenzie lost everything.

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Pop Quiz: The title, Isle of Dreams, refers to:

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There exists a fascination with Emily Dickinson, a genius in a tiny bedroom scribbling poems that would become legendary. A mythological recluse writing about life, but not participating in it.

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Even the most enthusiastic admirers of the late Roberto Bolaño must wonder sometimes if there is really a case for posthumously publishing everything that he ever wrote.

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Here is a Southern literary novel that takes the reader back to 1920 and the back hills of the Carolina highlands where horses are still the main means of travel.

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The good thing about anthologies is that it gives readers an opportunity for quick reads, without a lot of the flowery and extraneous prose that often bogs down other novels.

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Mason’s in a bit of a bind, though he might not admit it to you.

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Dr. Zhivago is a big book, physically and in terms of its themes, multi-stranded storylines and historical backdrop.

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The hardscrabble life of Appalachia is well-explored territory, mapped with notable success most recently by the likes of Tony Earley and Ron Rash.

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The promotional materials that accompanied my review copy of James Franco’s debut fiction collection, Palo Alto, set the bar impossibly high for the 30-something actor-turned-writer.

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In Grim Reaper: End of Days, Steve Alten offers up an ambitious tale of a hero’s journey through Hell.

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In the Hebrew edition of Yael Hedaya’s novel Eden the second of three chapters named for the character Dafna begins with the following paragraph:

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Charles Simic has been around for along time and has seen a great deal. He was born in Belgrade in 1938 and his early years were spent, with his family, as displaced people in war-torn Europe.

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Motherlode, the fictional dusty California gold-rush town whose evolution Mary Volmer portrays so charmingly in her debut novel, is a character of its own—a gawky preteen of a sort, a formerly happ

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Jakob Sammelsohn hovers on the fringes of central European history, meeting real life figures and becoming caught up in landmark events of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Ms. Glass’s talent lies in writing about the complexities of family dynamics. The Widower’s Tale is her fourth novel and takes place in an idyllic, suburban Boston community.

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An arrogant talking head has just humiliated his well-meaning director, Henry, in front of his crew.

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“Tracing our steps from the beginning / Until they vanished into the air / Trying to understand how our lives had led us there.”
—Jackson Browne

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“Occasionally the literary world is treated to a book that seems to have been written with divine inspiration.

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Taroko Gorge is Jacob’s debut novel. The setting is Taiwan’s National Park and the story is littered with a cast of international characters.

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Readers be warned: this review of Bryan Batt’s She Ain’t Heavy, She’s My Mother, will violate the first rule of book reviewing laid down by John Updike: “Try to understand what the author

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 Bloomsbury USA, September 2009 Ms. Randall has crafted a fascinating and serious novel of the 20th Century Civil Rights movement.

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Ann Brashares’ latest novel, My Name Is Memory, is the perfect melding of historical and contemporary fiction.

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Marcel Möring’s In a Dark Wood is a highly literary, imaginative, and experimental novel that explores large themes—including Jewish identity after the Holocaust and the search for meaning

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Every week, tens of thousands of NASCAR fans line sweltering racetracks in hopes of being up close when a spectacular crash occurs.

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