Genre Fiction

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Think of fiction as falling into two broad categories and leave aside all of the subgenres that you’ll find a book under in bookstores or libraries.

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How many wonder what their life would be like if they chose a different path? This is the crux of Ellen Meister’s riveting novel, The Other Life.

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Language is magic. It allows us to communicate the intangible as well as the concrete; to relate history, invent story, and blend both into the sometimes maddening mix called legend.

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A ten-spread (20 page) board book with a nice puffy cover, All Kinds of Kisses explores, well, all kinds of kisses.

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The ravages of war can be horrendous, both physically as well as emotionally, and nowhere is this more evident than in this true-to-life story about three close friends and their love for the men w

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“The life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.”
—Thomas Hobbes, English political philosopher (1588-–1679), The Leviathan

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This is a novel that finishes well. That being said, the first half of the novel is a muddy bog.

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The hardscrabble life of Appalachia is well-explored territory, mapped with notable success most recently by the likes of Tony Earley and Ron Rash.

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Teaching a child to have compassion is important. Jane Bregoli’s The Goat Lady is a true story that shows how love can bring an elderly outcast back into the folds of society.

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In the Hebrew edition of Yael Hedaya’s novel Eden the second of three chapters named for the character Dafna begins with the following paragraph:

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Suspect is a young adult mystery novel. Ellen, the mother of a young child has gone missing, and that young child is now seventeen-year-old Jen.

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Mullaby, North Carolina, is a sleepy town full of the rich scent of barbecue and the sound of closely kept secrets, secrets that glow in the dark and smell of sparkling sugar and vanilla.

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Mr. Mortimer has brought to the study of the American Civil War the biography of Pryce Lewis.

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Joe Hill’s Horns is an assured second novel from a well credentialed, award-winning, author.

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To define Hazie Coogan’s relationship with legendary actress Katherine Kenton is no easy task. She is more than a personal assistant, companion, housemaid, or even number-one fan.

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Robin Cook’s latest release, Cure, offers the reader intrigue and suspense, as well as in-depth insight into the world of international organized crime and scientific medical research.

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Fear or faith? When the world comes to an end, how will you respond?

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 Ballantine Books, November 2009 If you’ve ever wondered what would happen if reality and time sort of collapsed, look no further than Total Oblivion.

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 Viking, December 2009 Science fiction abhors a Utopia the way nature abhors a vacuum. When the two meet, something has to be done to undo one of them.

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Cat the Cat, Who is THAT? Is a simply written story that teaches friendship to children up to five years of age.

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My Dad My Hero, a 32-page picture book, examines how special fathers are in a child’s life.

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Sometime in the early 1800s, somewhere in not-so-merry old England, doddering old Lord Upton lost his mind.

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Every once in a while, a book comes along that is so creatively out-of-the box that the reader isn’t quite sure what he holds in his hands.

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Full and proper character development appears to be becoming a lost art in fiction, but author Christina Baker Kline does her bit to revive the art in the intriguing novel Bird in Hand.

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John Grisham is famous for his two-dozen bestselling adult thrillers, including The Firm, The Pelican Brief, and The Client.

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