Historical Fiction

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A Bend in the Stars is a thrilling read that sends a chilling message as to how history could repeat itself if we don’t heed the lessons of the past.”

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“Certainly this novel is timely, a reminder of the United States’ inexcusable inhumanity 70 years ago when it cruelly blocked desperate refugees.”

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In the dazzling 1915 novella, The Metamorphosis, Kafka’s anti-hero Gregor Samsa wakes one morning and finds himself turned into an insect—as punishment for incest, some critics have sugges

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First published in 1931 and later in 1988, Castle Gripsholm is a short novel by German journalist, satirist, commentator, playwright, songwriter, poet, and novelist Kurt Tucholsky.

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"The unexpected lurks at every corner."

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“an absorbing story sure to capture the hearts of historical fiction fans who appreciate a uniquely told tale of those willing to defy the status quo with bravery and steadfastness.”

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“The Poison Bed is a riveting retelling of history.”

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“This novel may be a ghost story with more than a tinge of the Gothic, but in the end it’s actually a story of near-obsessive love.”

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Machines Like Me is the result of very special literary brain, the master of all he turns his writing to, fantasying deep into our imagination, a novelist with the ability to turn complex

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“The Last Year of the War is timely and important today, when thousands of would-be immigrants from Latin America are cruelly being held in detention centers or de

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“That Churchill Woman is an engaging and heartrending account of a complex woman living in a complicated world who learns that no one can live their life entirely

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“A timely, and more importantly, a vivid, often searing examination of the lives, attitudes, and emotional baggage of immigrants and Americans in a small California town.”

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“The Quintland Sisters transports the reader to another time period . . .

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“Macallister’s exploration of both the public and the personal takes this novel to a higher level.”

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Famous Men Who Never Lived uses a classic science fiction trope (alternate universes) to explore the urgent question of what it means to be a refugee.

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A beautifully written novel, translated from the Italian, with a heartwarming story against a backcloth of misery and degradation, about a priest and a gang of boys and one of the boy’s sister, 16-

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“Lindsay Faye has written a crackling historical mystery in language that sings in its dialogue, description, and narrative.”

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"The Kingdom of Copper will appeal to fans of epic fantasy across the board . . ."

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“For such an unabashedly polemical first novel, The Patricide of George Benjamin Hill works surprising well, due in large measure to the unremitting intensity of Charlesworth’s wri

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“Moving On goes on and on, but you'll keep reading just the same.”

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“Like The Thirteenth Tale, Once Upon a River is very much a story about the spellbinding power of storytelling, and the stories troubled people tell themselves and each other to ma

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­­­­­The Court Dancer is a meditation on the social changes that force people to confront the double-edged swords of tradition and modernism.”

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echoes of Cormac McCarthy’s eerie, early Appalachian writing.”

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“William Boyd is a master of the character biography, of evoking place and time, of expressing the human condition with its longings, its fleeting moments of bliss, its crushing inequities,

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“From the decadence of high-society balls, to the swankiness of Belmont horse racing, murder and scandals abound.”

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