Science & Math

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Over the past few days this February 2011, a computer called Watson, built and programmed by IBM researchers, has played the game of Jeopardy! against two of the contest’s best players.

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Bird Cloud, Annie Proulx’s memoir-cum-construction diary is an amuse-bouche of a book, a lovely nibble of a thing, that has, strangely, been inserted somewhere deep in the rich, dense feas

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Len Fisher is an author of popular science, and his How to Dunk a Doughnut was named Best Popular Science Book of the Year by the American Institute of Physics.

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If you like your science explained rather than asserted, if you like your science writers articulate and intelligible, if you like popular science to make sense, even as it probes the heart of diff

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The exact age of our universe is one of the biggest mysteries—if not THE biggest—that we can imagine.

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Let’s get the easy part out of the way: I highly recommend The Quiet World: Saving Alaska’s Wilderness Kingdom (1879–1960) by Rice University history professor Douglas Brinkley.

Death and sex are literature’s subjects, not science’s. What we care most about is what these subjects mean to us—not what they, in fact, are.

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I don’t know. I am torn over The Secret World of Slugs and Snails: Life in the Very Slow Lane. On the one hand, it is an encyclopedia of snail and slug information.

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For the past four hundred years, Galileo, Siderius nuncius, and Galileo’s subsequent trial at the Inquisition have been used in many contexts to tell many types of stories.

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This 301-page book is an examination of what happens to a human body after death.

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A physicist who writes a popularization of science takes different kinds of risks than the popular science writer.

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One of the ongoing mysteries of physics is why stuff weighs what it does.

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He modestly calls himself “both a physician and a storyteller.” Renowned neurologist and psychiatrist Dr.

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Bill Bryson provides the introduction to this wonderful book written for the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society, founded in 1660 in London.

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If there were a “Watchman” to protect us from danger, he would be shaking his rattle vigorously right now.

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Why Does E=mc2? is one of those questions that educated
non-physicists must have been asking themselves for over a hundred

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The book doesn’t begin in the Middle Ages with Thomas Aquinas or Robert Grosseteste. Not overtly, anyway.

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As fascinating as it is, we tend to take our solar system for granted. After all, from our puny human perspective, the local astronomical real estate doesn’t change much.

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 Ecklund sent surveys, each containing $15, to professors and researchers of the natural and social sciences at various elite higher-education institutions across the United States.

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The world of popular science writing is a fiercely competitive one, and its inhabitants attempt to ensure their own survival by choosing an audience (technically educated or not?

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When I was six, thousands of large, black, ants suddenly covered the floor of my bathroom. I have been fascinated by ants ever since.

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The wilderness is appealing to most people. At least, most appreciate its beauty and its unknown qualities, if not its danger and isolation.

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Don’t be fooled by this breezy and entertaining book; there are valuable lessons to be learned here.

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This year’s Slap-In-The-Face-Get-A-Grip-Bub Award for business books goes to Jeffrey Pfeffer, business professor at Stanford and author of nine volumes on organization dynamics.

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