Women’s Fiction

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“This is about survival! You think I want to do this?”

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The new novel The Unseen World starts out like the 2014 bestseller We Are Not Ourselves, as the haunting story of a brilliant scientist who develops early-onset Alzheimer’s diseas

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Age of Consent is a strong novel about a troubling subject.”

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“a well-written story by an inventive writer.”

“She thought about secrets and the damage they did.”

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"Lost Along the Way is a light summer read . . ."

“No—to friendships that are worth more than any argument.”

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What happens when a creative woman does what she's supposed to instead of what she wants most?

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Kate and Hannah have been best friends since the day in fifth grade when Hannah stood up for Kate after a boy tried to look up her dress.

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“warm and funny, touching in unpredictable chapters, and filled with McMillan’s signature snappy dialogue and salty inner monologue.”

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“Cathleen Schine has written a beautiful book that should be on every nightstand this summer.”

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One does not have to share blood to be a sister, for sometimes an emotional bond is greater than a biological one. Such is the case with Robin and Cecilia.

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Lisa has survived breast cancer and reached her 50th birthday only to discover, in a most humiliating moment during her surprise birthday party, that her husband has been cheating on her.

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Starting in the 1960s and up to today, Mimi deftly weaves her tale, like the best and most intimate of diaries, skipping the dull moments and focusing on those that mean the most to the overall nar

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When your world is falling apart around you, what do you do?

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A mysterious benefactor offers $500,000 to Elizabeth and Richard, two complete strangers, if they will spend two hours together every week for a year.

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“Joshilyn Jackson hits both emotional nerves and the funny bone in this insightful novel.”

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“a winner read that should appeal to a variety of literary and genre tastes.”

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It is said that every human being on earth has a doppelganger, but what if yours lived an exciting, dangerous life 800 years ago and now you’re invited to participate?

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“the story is charming and readers who enjoy romance ought to give this a try, even if they aren’t huge fans of the GBLTQ scene—this is a great toe-dip into those waters without the oft-ass

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The Ramblers is populated with a cast of requisite women’s lit characters—thirty-something best friends since college; a rich, romantic older lover; a hunky, artistic, rebounding divorced

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Potential is unrealized in Mingmei Yip’s newest novel. The dialogue is awkwardly delivered and falls flat.

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The title of the novel comes from a Charles Atlas slogan. This book is for the reader who enjoys experimental or postmodern fiction. This is a book to think about.

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For the average Western reader, diving into Hend Al Qassemi’s debut novel Black Book of Arabia is an eye-opener.

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“a warm and slyly funny look at small towns and romance . . .”

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The simple sentences and unspoken words of My Name Is Lucy Barton are deceptive.

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Ask Him Why is a multi-layered narrative with a central theme about the consequences of rushing to judgement without trying to understand the other side by first asking, “Why?” 

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