Psychological Thriller

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“for a lie to become truth, the past only needs to be rewritten . . .”

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The couple at the heart of this novel—Rob Beauman and Ellie Larrabee—appear on the surface to have everything.

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Kaitlyn Greenidge’s debut about family, race, and eugenics is a haunting coming-of-age novel.

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Jane Mendelsohn’s Burning Down the House is a soap opera of a novel that aspires to be a Greek tragedy, an epic, or a saga of the fall of a family empire . . .

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“especially relevant in this present age of religious violence and moral bankruptcy.”

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The psychological tortures that  Roberto Arlt puts his main protagonist through are on a par with those endured by Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment or Dmitri Karamazov.

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Many girls grow up dreaming of marriage and a family and most times their dreams come true.

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The title of the novel comes from a Charles Atlas slogan. This book is for the reader who enjoys experimental or postmodern fiction. This is a book to think about.

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It’s 1978 and John Lennon has taken off from everyone and everything he knows to find peace in his soul and songs in his psyche.

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“the secret to marriage [does] not lie in compatibility, or even commitment, but the willingness to endure heartbreak.”

“The nicest people can have the darkest secrets.”

Tropes abound in this rather muddled novel about the murder of a teenaged girl in an English village.

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“. . . the writing and storytelling compelled the suspension of disbelief and acceptance of the unimaginable.

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“. . . reading this novel is like—exquisite torture.”
“I exist!”

“I will prove it to you!”

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“. . . a thought-provoking and thrilling mystery.”

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“A Quiet Vendetta is highly recommended for readers interested in the psychological makeup and motivation behind the actions of both the hunter and his prey.

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“The Break is reminiscent of Italian neo-realist cinema of the late 1940s and is enthusiastically recommended to all readers.

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“Reminiscent of John Saul’s creepy, brainy novels, The Night Strangers is a psychological thriller overflowing with horror and suspense.

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“Sorry has all the ingredients to make it a compulsive read. It’s slick, chock full of twists and turns, and dripping with narrative thrust and intrigue. . . .

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“On the credit side, Mr. Drvenkar’s narrative and dialogue are strong and move each section of the story along. He selects his words with care . . .

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“This family is so real, so understandable, so in need of comfort each in their own way, that we want to embrace them in their grief, applaud their reconciliations, and learn from their lov

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“Pretty is ex-pretty girl Bebe Baker’s story. . . . Bebe’s in-your-face voice is one of the novel’s strengths. . . . At times Bebe is maddening, but in Ms.

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