Coming of Age

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Among the many different cultural subsets in New York City, there is a group of food elitists.

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Izabella Rae Haywood, teenage heroine of What the Waves Know, has lost her words. She has not spoken in eight years, ever since her father disappeared on her sixth birthday.

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“. . . outstanding on every level . . . heaven sent.”

The Hanging Garden, Patrick White’s posthumous novel, is absolutely luminous, its publication a gift.

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“. . . some very fine writing indeed, . . . I want to read [it] aloud just for the joy of hearing precisely how the words have been strung together.”

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“Office Girl’s target readership, like its characters, are legally adults—even though some may still be growing up.”

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“. . . rich in history, steeped in family tradition, and full of emotion—a lesson in practiced elegance.”

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“This tender, coming of age debut novel is seasoned throughout with similes and metaphors, adding spice to the characters and the description of this scenic yet secluded setting.

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“Edmund White who wrote The Beautiful Room Is Empty. Edmund White who gave us A Boy’s Own Story as well. It is as if he owes it to us to always excel.

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“Leigh Stein’s debut successfully captures the purgatory between childhood and becoming an adult.

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“Ultimately, The Marriage Plot is very much a moral tale while at the same time being a literary romp through 80s-style sex, love, and marriage.

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“Linda Urbach preserves the integrity of a classic, while adding another sparkling gem to the literary crown.”

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“. . . curiosity, that powerful driver of discovery, is only as valuable as what it turns up.

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“Child Wonder is an apt title; the author excels at capturing the essence of a young boy trying to navigate changing events in his life.

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“. . . brilliant and gritty and urban . . . the most brutal coming of age story imaginable.”

The Kid is by far the most disturbing novel I have ever read.

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“. . . a plot-driven novel conveyed in crisp, descriptive, and thought-provoking prose via an engagingly intelligent third-person narrator. . . . an auspicious debut.”

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“Slated for film, Hick is a gripping, gut-wrenching story depicting the harsh realities of the life of a young, defenseless runaway.

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If a typical plot structure is and then, and then, and then, Jennifer Close’s plot in Girls in White Dresses might be described as and again, and again, and again, and again.

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“Camille Noe Pagán’s debut sweeps the reader up and effortlessly carries them across decades of friendship, heartache, and pain.”

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Skinny, by Diana Spechler is as divine, decadent, and sumptuous as a gourmet dessert.

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Bonnie Jo Campbell (a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award finalist) takes on tough subjects in her fiction, and this tale of a rebellious wilderness girl in Michigan is no ex

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Primarily a World War One story, but also a coming-of-age novel and a tale about fathers and sons and brothers, Andrew Krivak’s well-researched and well-told tale, The Sojourn, is a valuab

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John Grisham is famous for his two-dozen bestselling adult thrillers, including The Firm, The Pelican Brief, and The Client.

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 Nobunny’s Perfect is a simply illustrated, 32-page picture book that teaches children about different kinds of behavior and about using good manners. Nobunny’s Perfect uses bunny chi

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Cat the Cat, Who is THAT? Is a simply written story that teaches friendship to children up to five years of age.

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