Coming of Age

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ANGST and DISPAIR, in all capitals, are clearly the driving forces behind Robin Wasserman’s latest novel, Girls on Fire.

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The publicity copy for Songs of My Selfie: An Anthology of Millennial Stories explains it all:

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“will easily be remembered as one of the most unique and unforgettable werewolf tales ever written.”

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Gunnar Bishop assumes guardianship of his five-year-old niece RubyLyn after her parents die. Now, in 1969, RubyLyn ("Roo") is 15 and works in her uncle's tobacco field in Nameless, Kentucky.

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“Travis Mulhauser hits it out of the park in his first novel. . . . overwhelming triumph . . .”

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“if you like your novels dark and stormy, this one is a winner.”

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The author crafts passages of agonizing psychological self-torment with a master's ear for the perfect phrase.”

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Ask Him Why is a multi-layered narrative with a central theme about the consequences of rushing to judgement without trying to understand the other side by first asking, “Why?” 

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“What meaning does your finite existence have in the infinite world?”

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Among the many different cultural subsets in New York City, there is a group of food elitists.

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Izabella Rae Haywood, teenage heroine of What the Waves Know, has lost her words. She has not spoken in eight years, ever since her father disappeared on her sixth birthday.

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“. . . outstanding on every level . . . heaven sent.”

The Hanging Garden, Patrick White’s posthumous novel, is absolutely luminous, its publication a gift.

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“. . . some very fine writing indeed, . . . I want to read [it] aloud just for the joy of hearing precisely how the words have been strung together.”

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“Office Girl’s target readership, like its characters, are legally adults—even though some may still be growing up.”

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“. . . rich in history, steeped in family tradition, and full of emotion—a lesson in practiced elegance.”

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“This tender, coming of age debut novel is seasoned throughout with similes and metaphors, adding spice to the characters and the description of this scenic yet secluded setting.

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“Edmund White who wrote The Beautiful Room Is Empty. Edmund White who gave us A Boy’s Own Story as well. It is as if he owes it to us to always excel.

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“Leigh Stein’s debut successfully captures the purgatory between childhood and becoming an adult.

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“Ultimately, The Marriage Plot is very much a moral tale while at the same time being a literary romp through 80s-style sex, love, and marriage.

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“Linda Urbach preserves the integrity of a classic, while adding another sparkling gem to the literary crown.”

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“. . . curiosity, that powerful driver of discovery, is only as valuable as what it turns up.

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“Child Wonder is an apt title; the author excels at capturing the essence of a young boy trying to navigate changing events in his life.

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“. . . brilliant and gritty and urban . . . the most brutal coming of age story imaginable.”

The Kid is by far the most disturbing novel I have ever read.

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“. . . a plot-driven novel conveyed in crisp, descriptive, and thought-provoking prose via an engagingly intelligent third-person narrator. . . . an auspicious debut.”

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