Children

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Children ages four to eight naturally ask a lot of “how” questions, and National Geographic Kids Little Kids First Big Book of How by Jill Esbaum attempts to answer every single one of the

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It is always exciting to discover real-life heroes you never heard of before, especially when the hero is a cross-dresser, impersonator, nurse, Civil War soldier, and spy all rolled into one—and he

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In the Merriam Webster dictionary, the definition of a fairy tale is a story in which improbable events lead to a happy ending.

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Coco Chanel is a fashion version of Cinderella—minus the Prince Charming since she had so many Prince Charmings.

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“What are you saying—that my kid has bad manners?”

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Here's the premise of The Finger Sports Game: draw a face on the tip of one or more of your long fingers, then stick it through the hole(s) to pretend you are the head of the body

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True picture book lovers will be bowled over with National Geographic Kids latest title, Why? Over 1,111 Answers to Everything by Crispin Boyer.

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Eric Morse’s What Is Punk? is an odd project, given that it’s aimed at 3–7 year-olds and meant to, at least according to the back cover, “[lay] the groundwork for the next generation of li

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Although this slim and petite volume is supposedly aimed at the juvenile crowd, it must be said that the book possesses a great deal of charm and charisma for those of us of more advanced age.

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Hoot, Hoot, Hooray! is an inspiring chapter book that tells about three different animal rescues. The first is Paul and Babe, two owlets that fell out of a tree.

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Brainy books aren’t for everyone, but if you’re one of those who love everything “brain” including how your brain works, how it perceives and relays those perceptions to you, and how—in many ways—i

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There is so much of history that we are still unaware of, so many tidbits waiting patiently to be discovered.

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Genius is all around us, yet it can still be a challenging concept to define. Thankfully, author Deborah Kespert seems to have found a delightful way to tell the story of genius.

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“the perfect keepsake for history lovers everywhere.”

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Young children love asking “how” and “why” questions almost as much as they love flipping through lively and colorful picture books.

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Suffice to say National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book of Who is amply illustrated.

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a lucid and humorous expose of how particular facial features help 25 animals survive.”

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Catalan architect Anotni Gaudí may have been laughed at by many for his whimsical creations, but he went on to become one of the most important architects of the 19th century.

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“. . . readers feel like they are going along on the journey—minus the disease and frostbite.”

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“Kadir Nelson has created a beautiful, heartfelt tribute to an icon of social justice.”

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“The sweetly repetitive language delivered with just the right amount of parental love emphasizes a larger concept: similarity by virtue of the simple state of being human.”

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“. . . an uplifting tale of compassion and triumph. . . . a humble hero worthy of admiration.”

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“. . . channeling Michael Lewis sets a pretty high bar, and the attempt makes Confessions of a Microfinance Heretic more fun to read than most financial books.”

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“In the end the message of Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World is one of acceptance and inclusion, using autism awareness and educatio

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