African American

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Glory Edim is the founder of the hugely successful Well-Read Black Girl, a Brooklyn-based book club and digital platform that celebrates the uniqueness of black literature and sisterhood.

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Kehinde Wiley, the artist known for his portraits of street blacks in historical settings, said, “Art is about changing what we see in our everyday lives and representing it in such a way that it g

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Long a staple of antebellum American newspapers, “ranaway slave” advertisements afford the reader fascinating—if also horrific and heartbreaking—insights into the lives of fugitive slaves and their

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“Mosley’s new book, John Woman, though it only intermittently delivers the tautly rendered violence and suspense of his detective fiction, is as provocative and morally instructive

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Kiki Petrosino’s Witch Wife invites us to enter into a feminine, private world of post-puberty anxieties, love relationships, and nostalgia in which the desire for and fear of motherhood a

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What should “A Reader” attempt to do? One looks for it to provide an overview of an author’s work. The reader is a book that should be suitable for the classroom and instruction.

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“Ladee Hubbard has written a celebration of family, as well as of the individual.”

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"skillfully woven . . ."

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"an entertaining, engaging crime novel."

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“Given the recent happenings in Charlottesville, Virginia, it’s hard to imagine a more relevant release date for this lovely, important book. This is a book for our time.”

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“Clemmons’ voice is natural and appealing . . . and . . . what she is telling us is powerfully poignant and emotional, even at times, devastatingly resonant. . . .

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“a love story that is also a survival story of beauty and hope.”

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The Life and Times of Persimmon Wilson is a startling novel following the life of Persimmons Wilson, a former slave that fights in the Civil War, only to be imprisoned and hanged once he o

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“You need not be a bird lover or watcher to enjoy this book, but there’s a good chance you will love both birds and life more by its end.”

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One could compare the artistic career of Clarence Major to that of musical genius Miles Davis. Major has always been miles ahead of other African American writers.

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This thought-provoking novel is set in the years just after the Civil War.

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The 1920s is one of those decades everyone seems to look back at with fascination and nostalgia.

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quickly read but not easily forgotten. It’s a lovely story . . .”

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“warm and funny, touching in unpredictable chapters, and filled with McMillan’s signature snappy dialogue and salty inner monologue.”

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“Chasing the North Star is an epic journey, vividly detailed, acutely satisfying, and ultimately hopeful.”

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Kaitlyn Greenidge’s debut about family, race, and eugenics is a haunting coming-of-age novel.

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Set in the late 80s, Jed has escaped Chicago and the beginning of the AIDS crisis to return to where he experienced a hedonist paradise during his college days.

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This novel is as finely tuned as the best banjo played by 19-year-old runaway slave Henry Sims.

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It’s not every day you get a PI book sent to you for reviewing written by an actual authentic-to-the-bone private investigator, so I was really intrigued and looking forward to reading this debut n

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“perfect for young children just learning America’s history, long-time history buffs, and readers who love a stroll down memory lane . . .”

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