Literary Fiction

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The search for the truth can often be elusive. The truth itself can be devastating.

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Martyrdom Street, by Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet, is an interesting and informative book about life in Iran and America during the Revolution and after the Iran-Iraq War from about 1979 to 1993

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Beyond Those Distant Stars is science fiction that plays well to a female audience. The heroine, Stella McMasters, is a cyborg.

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The Blending Time is aimed at ages 12 and up, but there are parts that seem shocking in the context of a YA novel—shocking in the context of reality—even though they’re obviously references to even

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Marcel Möring’s In a Dark Wood is a highly literary, imaginative, and experimental novel that explores large themes—including Jewish identity after the Holocaust and the search for meaning

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“You’ll like it. No, I’d prefer you to suck me off,” he said.
“While I wear my cock,” she said.
“Yes.”
“While I wear my big thick green cock.”
“That’s what I want.”

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How to Read the Air finds Dinaw Mengestu building on many of the themes that made his debut novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, both a delight and a sorrow to read.

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A leading Spanish postmodernist novelist paraphrases, summarizes, and cites James Joyce’s modernist “mistresspiece,” most-loved of all that Irishman’s works.

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Reading the work of a truly talented author is a well-savored delight for a book lover. When it comes to the art of writing, C. W. Gortner’s name can be added to the list of master craftsmen.

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Marta Scheider’s life story begins in the early 1900s, a period of hard times in Europe and in her Swiss homeland in particular.

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This is Benjamin Percy’s first novel following his successful short story collections Refresh, Refresh (Graywolf, 2007) and The Language of Elk (Carnegie Mellon, 2006).

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In his newest novel, Crimes of the Father, Booker Prize-winner Thomas Keneally succeeds in the seemingly impossible task of burrowing deeply into the mindset of a pedophilic Catholic pries

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