Graphic Novels & Comics

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Good guys? Bad guys? Morality? Ethics? Who's to say where any of this plays in to The Troop. This is not the usual superhero fare.

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will . . . fire the imaginations of emerging writers, readers, and movie buffs.”

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Let's face it, back in October 2003 The Walking Dead lit a fire under every writer that was a zombie fan.

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The emergence of the comic book to a more mature graphic novel can easily be equated to a butterfly rising from a cocoon.

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The appeal of The Flash TV show on the CW network transcends age groups in a way that few television shows ever really do any more.

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“I’m a room without a door. A war artist, without a war.”

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Released in 1968, Music from Big Pink by The Band changed the musical landscape.

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"Jimmy Chee cannot die."

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In author/illustrator Andy Warner’s latest graphic novel, Brief Histories of Everyday Objects, just about every major object invented on planet earth is featured in black-and-white comic s

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“These are stories to be enjoyed by all ages for both their absurdity and beauty.”

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Yuge!, Garry Trudeau’s new compilation of strips from the juggernaut that is Doonesbury, is ideal for those who feel that they have not, over the past few months, gotten their fil

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Cousin Joseph is a nostalgic treatment of a bygone era and a good read for those comfortable with the guardrails of its genre.”

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For Green Arrow: A Celebration of 75 Years, publisher DC Comics has dug through their massive vaults to find the perfect summation of the life of Oliver Queen.

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From the 1960s through the early ‘90s, Italy was host to an artistic subgenre known as “sexy fumetti,” a wild blend of eroticism, horror, violence, and some extremely messed-up humor.

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At least as frustrating as a bad book—which, after all, can be tossed aside and forgotten—is a good book that could have been even better.

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One day Gabby Schulz came down with a bad fever. The end result was Sick, published by Secret Acres.

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Written as a traditional manga, and meant to be read as one (back to front, right to left), artist Rokudenashiko, a play on the Japanese words “useless” and “good-for-nothing,” tells her story of b

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The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye “presented by” Sonny Liew is a collector’s item—like a good wine or a piece of fine, old furniture—in its beautiful and artfully aged presentation; and al

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This slipcased two-volume edition contains the unique issue of It Aint Me Babe (1970) and 17 issues of Wimmen’s Comix produced between 1972 and 1992—all of which are now out of pr

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Patrick McDonnell, creator of Mutts, describes Underworld as “outrageous, demented, perverted, and politically incorrect, but somehow it's also charming, endearing, compelling, an

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The story of a genetically engineered assassin, Showman Killer: Heartless Hero takes place in a far-off galaxy sometime in the distant future.

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Beginning with the slipcover presentation that reveals a second cover underneath, to the story and illustrations themselves, Junction True presents itself as different from the start.

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The first appearance of Superman in Action #1 (June 1938) was an atom bomb that blew up the world of publishing, pulps and magazines.

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“a gorgeous, playful artwork in and of itself about art, creating art, order, and randomness.”

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With Japanese ghosts and demons, author Sean Michael Wilson and illustrator Michiru Morikawa have created cultural Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark in comic form.

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