Genre Fiction

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Three years ago, a Border Collie puppy, more human than canine, was placed in a New York shelter with his three littermates. Feeling lonely and abandoned, he plans to be chosen by the perfect perso

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“A lovely, gorgeously set, romantic story sure to charm lovers of historical fiction with its joie de vivre and savoir faire.”

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The Chanel Sisters is a well-researched historical fiction that depicts France’s Belle Epoch and post-war change.

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It seems a shame when a story begins with the death of the protagonist, but it signals the book’s trajectory and creates a story that must be told, now, lest it be forgotten.

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Have you ever not wanted a book to end? Were disappointed that the characters are gone from your life?

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“an entrancing family story and a surprising adventure. Gregory’s female characters are, as always, clearly human, deeply thoughtful, and driven by their own desires and agency.

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Mother for Dinner is a deeply uncomfortable novel. At times, it’s funny. At others, it’s a too-accurate examination of family ties. It’s also. . . about eating human flesh . . .

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The author’s portrayal of the adolescent girl is so graceful, so intelligently sensitive, the writing so lyrical and lovely . . .”

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The Wonder Boy of Whistle Stop is a captivating novel with characters and relationships to be savored, as well as ample servings of hope and inspiration.”

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“this story sends a message of the bygone days, while offering laughter, insight, fear, pain, and a deep and abiding friendship.”

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“Hornsby's vivid description of the Kansas bar would make Hemingway smile.”

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“the story Follett weaves grabs you from the start and holds you in its grip till the fairy tale ending.

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Daughters of the Wild has an intriguing, deeply marketable premise: oppressed and repressed girls, isolated from the outside world, “tending a mysterious plant called the Vine of Heaven” i

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Memorial is a deeply moving book by a young novelist with a unique voice and a strong sense of optimism.”

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“. . . supremely skilled writing even though the plot goes missing in action early on.”

This is an odd duck of a book, no question about it.

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How many who have been forced to deal with a life crisis can start over—and in a tropical setting, no less? Irene Steele’s life is turned upside down after learning  

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It is the end of August and Norah Ramsey, a single mom is raising her 15-year-old daughter, Violet in Raleigh, North Carolina. Norah, who is estranged from her mother Polly, hopes to make a better

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With everything going on in our world these days, chances are you’ve not thought much about the many difficult issues surrounding adoption.

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“A convoluted story of how justice will prevail, even if it takes an extraordinarily long time to do so.”

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What would you do if you were in a plane crash, but managed to survive? Being so close to death, it's only logical anyone would reassess their life.

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1986. Fulgencio Ramirez, a pharmacist in a border town called La Frontera, reads the obit section every morning, waiting for a man to die so he can move in and scoop up his wife.

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Miss Iceland is a beautiful novel about artistic aspiration and friendship. The storytelling sparkles . . .”

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“The Boy in the Field is a literary mystery novel. . . . Just not the kind that focuses on what happens on a patch of land, a highway, or even a country.

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“There is no question that Nemerever is a gifted writer. The rich style, precise in description and filled with witty metaphor, carries one along.”

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