Genre Fiction

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This Town Sleeps is genuinely enjoyable. It has threads of mystery and romance. It combines humor and horror. It’s a good book . . .”

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“Mather’s chaotic scenes that place Del in life-threatening situations, and of which she expertly extricates herself, are well written and page turning.”

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“a haunting portrait of a nation slowly collapsing . . .”

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This wrenching, engrossing, and sometimes windy novel arrives on our shores firmly rooted in the Elena Ferrante tradition: a portrayal of an area in the south of Italy (Puglia in this case) that fo

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Willa and Harper Lakey are as close as two sisters could be, even considering their dissimilar personalities.

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A touch lighter on the hard science of space flight and a lot heavier on intrigue, new and old readers will find themselves quickly immersed in this complex alternate hist

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“For a perfect summer read, look no further. You’re not likely to find more beautiful, more distinctive prose anywhere.”

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“Connie Schultz has a reputation for writing about everyday people and their lives.

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You don’t need to love dogs to love this book. You just have to love and respect animals and enjoy police procedurals.

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This is the authors’ third book taking place in a fictional community in America called Night Vale, where ghosts, angels, aliens, and government conspiracies are adroitly brought to life.

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“A riveting, inventive, quietly disconcerting page-turner.”

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“moments of brilliance . . .”

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Surely, Alexander McCall Smith isn’t the only philosopher in the world who writes novels. But he’s probably the best known and one of the most commercially successful.

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It is the summer of 1993 and 23-year-old Mallory Blessing is desperate to get away from her Baltimore childhood home.

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“Focusing on estrangement, abuse, forgiveness, and a chance for new beginnings, The Bitter and Sweet of Cherry Season is sure to tug at the heartstrings.” 

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Mostly Dead Things is an odd creature: a book widely recommended and popularly listed, but marked by a fundamental discomfort that defies mainstream appeal.

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“a shadowy fairy tale, in which two lovers, of which one, unfortunately, is dead, live in an enchanted house inhabited with wondrously quirky beings.”

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The Gordons of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, spend every summer at the century-old saltbox passed down from Ed Gordon's grandparents.

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“If Carlos Manuel Alvarez’s debut novel The Fallen is any indicator, he is a Cuban writer to watch.”

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And I Do Not Forgive You is uneven, but where it shines, it’s wonderful.”

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Looking for an escape from quarantine boredom, but want to minimize your screen time?  Then Hillary Mantel’s The Mirror and the Light, the final, nearly 800-page volume of her bestselling,

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Boys of Alabama is a beautiful book that carries the reader along on a tide of rich, eloquent language.”

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“My trainer believes in me,” Remington Alabaster tells Serenata, his wife of 32 years. Until now he has been a reliable couch potato, she an equally predictable fitness maven.

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“Meyerson does an admirable job of answering the question she posed to herself, and by the end of the story, ties up all the loose ends that she tossed out to the reader from the beginning.

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How many older women regret not doing things they've wanted to do in life?

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