Genre Fiction

Reviewed by: 

“A classic story of good versus evil, in which evil, though seemingly overcome, may simply lie dormant until it’s strong enough to strike from a different source.”

Reviewed by: 

The Daughter’s Tale is a brilliant, engrossing, immersive novel with extremely compelling characters.

Reviewed by: 

“Maden has definitely made this character and his supporting cast his own in this excellent third trip through the Tom Clancy universe.”

Reviewed by: 

“Labbé deliberately distorts conventional narrative forms to create a challenging but engaging text.”

Reviewed by: 

“Kwon wraps up the mystery of Sylvie’s disappearance at the end, but the discovery of how these characters change throughout the novel may be the more important journey.”

Reviewed by: 

“Weir’s presentation of Anna is interesting, intense, filled with myriad crises, and a fast read.”

Reviewed by: 

“What is most remarkable about Mostly Dead Things is that, despite the mishaps and travails of the Morton family, the novel is ultimately both highly entertaining and inspiring, as

Reviewed by: 

“a gorgeously written novel about race, about class, about street life and gender and the ragged ways we have chosen to define them.”

Reviewed by: 

“My Life as a Rat is a quiet, contemplative tour-de-force.”

 

Reviewed by: 

In West Mills powerfully pays homage to the defiant and affirming spirit of Their Eyes Were Watching God while imagining a vivid and compelling world with distinctive cha

Reviewed by: 

“Like a machine gun spraying noir at you nonstop. Can you take it? Can you parse the churning prose, figure out what the hell’s going on, and keep turning the pages?

Reviewed by: 

“superlatively imaginative . . .”

Reviewed by: 

A Bend in the Stars is a thrilling read that sends a chilling message as to how history could repeat itself if we don’t heed the lessons of the past.”

Reviewed by: 

Many readers in this quadrant of the globe have discovered Australian crime fiction—mysteries, thrillers, police procedurals—through television series created for broadcast and streaming services.

Reviewed by: 

This book, final volume of a trilogy, has been hailed as “hilarious” and “comedic” and similar terms.

Reviewed by: 

“a satisfying summer read.”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

If you’ve read Mary Miller’s captivating debut, The Last Days of California—an eccentrically peopled coming-of-age tale—you might be expecting something similar from her second novel,

Reviewed by: 

“This novel’s greatest strength is the simplicity of its message: two boys who grew up in such different worlds playing soccer in the backyard and sneaking off to eat raspas offer us a grea

Reviewed by: 

“Hockney’s creative output had taken a marked turn. Working in three dimensions changed his relationship to space. It enhanced his vision further the way his deafness had . . .

Reviewed by: 

First published in 1931 and later in 1988, Castle Gripsholm is a short novel by German journalist, satirist, commentator, playwright, songwriter, poet, and novelist Kurt Tucholsky.

Reviewed by: 

Many little girls love parties, and in 1988 Zoe O'Flaherty, age five, is about to enter kindergarten.

Reviewed by: 

“From murder and madness to secrets and fraught family relationships, the non-stop glitz gives this tale soapy sheen that makes for perfect escapist summer reading.”

Reviewed by: 

“Certainly this novel is timely, a reminder of the United States’ inexcusable inhumanity 70 years ago when it cruelly blocked desperate refugees.”

Reviewed by: 

In the dazzling 1915 novella, The Metamorphosis, Kafka’s anti-hero Gregor Samsa wakes one morning and finds himself turned into an insect—as punishment for incest, some critics have sugges

Reviewed by: 

"The unexpected lurks at every corner."

Pages