Fiction

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Lauren Dane first published Second Chances as a new author in 2005 with e-publisher Loose Id.

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Mistletoe, long evenings beside warm fires, even the inevitable eggnog-related indiscretion: It’s no wonder that romance jumps on the holiday bandwagon like no other genre.

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A lobster isn’t the most likely character for a children’s book. Yet Dave Wilkinson creates a modern-day fable based on the life cycle of the crustacean in The Aspirant.

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Katia Lief’s debut thriller, You Are Next, opens with Karin
Schaeffer gardening in the small yard of her Brooklyn, New York,

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The hardscrabble life of Appalachia is well-explored territory, mapped with notable success most recently by the likes of Tony Earley and Ron Rash.

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The small town of Southport, North Carolina, is as quiet as they come. It’s the perfect place to relax for a weekend or just get away—and that’s exactly what newcomer Katie has done.

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The Boss meets Bronte in April Lindner’s remake of the classic Victorian novel, Jane Eyre.

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With Known to Evil, Walter Mosley offers the second Leonid McGill mystery.

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Katla Gudrun LeBlanc is stuck in Minnesota.

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Bestselling, award-winning novelist, Debbie Macomber, writes a compassionate, yet quirky story of one man’s journey through grief—sabotaged by his lost love—who decides when his sadness should end.

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Steve Martin has been successful with most everything he touches or puts his mind to.

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Teaching a child to have compassion is important. Jane Bregoli’s The Goat Lady is a true story that shows how love can bring an elderly outcast back into the folds of society.

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Jimmy and Jack Sullivan, members of the band the Unknown Souls, travel the bar and club circuit hoping to make it big.

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In the Hebrew edition of Yael Hedaya’s novel Eden the second of three chapters named for the character Dafna begins with the following paragraph:

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Since he first stepped onto the page in 1994’s The Shape of Water, Andrea Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano has faced down gunrunners, drug lords, gambling rings, and his own mortality.

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Charles Simic has been around for along time and has seen a great deal. He was born in Belgrade in 1938 and his early years were spent, with his family, as displaced people in war-torn Europe.

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Michael Connelly has a legitimate claim to being one of the greatest living writers of police procedurals.

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Graphic novel versions of the classics almost always stir up some controversy, particularly when it’s Shakespeare who is being adapted.

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Former Eileen Ford model and fashion expert Kim Johnson Gross sets the tone right up front in this self-help book designed for women of a certain age.

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Most girls in high school are not the prettiest, the smartest, or the most experienced with boys. Most girls in high school are “mostly good girls.”

 

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In 2007 an intense debate heated up on the blogs of young adult authors Holly Black and Justine Larbalestier.

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Sometime in the early 1800s, somewhere in not-so-merry old England, doddering old Lord Upton lost his mind.

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Todd Johnson’s debut novel is not to be missed. This tale of five ordinary southern women will touch the reader’s heart. Set in a nursing home in rural Johnston County, N.

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The Postcard Killers by James Patterson and Liza Marklund is not a typical thriller. The riveting prologue sets the stage for promises the book is quick to deliver.

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Sometimes in life it takes the realization of the enormity of the problems of the less fortunate in the world to awaken individuals to issues that haunt them much closer to home.

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