Fiction

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Sarah Conley Hawkins, a big-shot reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, is offered a lucrative position with "Intelligentsia," an investigative news service in Washington, D.C.

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The thing about a smorgasbord is that you don’t need to savor every offering to feel happily fed.

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Untold Night and Day is a deliciously complex novel that satisfies at each layer as the reader continues to decipher its codes and hidde

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How many older women regret not doing things they've wanted to do in life?

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Kendra Troyer spends most of her young life caring for her younger siblings and protecting them from their abusive father and submissive mother.

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“Meyerson does an admirable job of answering the question she posed to herself, and by the end of the story, ties up all the loose ends that she tossed out to the reader from the beginning.

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Many of today's families are blended with step-siblings and half-siblings.

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“The Last Scoop is another surefire success for author R. G.

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“a thoroughly enjoyable book, for both the plot centering around a still-contemporary malady, as well as its historical description of a world on the brink of a new century.”

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Among the masterful short story writers of the 18th century in Russia—Turgenev, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy—it is Anton Chekhov whose words are most known outside of the motherland because

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Everything Under is a seductive book. It’s dark, poetic in language and image, and drives toward a monolithic tragedy.”

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“Okorafor’s future world, built out of real cultures and fully realized characters, should establish a new standard for science fiction in the 21st century.”

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“Even in the darkest sections, Ted O’Connell’s debut novel is upbeat, witty, and full of ideas about art, reality, truth, identity, fate, language, the rise of China on the world stage, Naz

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Forty stories in 160 pages. Short: some one page, a couple, four to five pages. Short: but with a bang. Short: You will read in a flash and say, “What was that?”

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“Friend offers a fascinating glimpse into the realities of North Korean life.

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“a delightful take on the new baby trope . . .”

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Sitting down with author-illustrator Emma Giuliani’s oversized picture book In the Garden is, from the outset, a giant welcome into the world of gardening.

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“This is one of those books the reader should never start if night is coming on and he’s alone in the house.”

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“filled with biting wit and smart dialogue, with a twist of an ending the diehard mystery reader won’t see coming—and an epilogue featuring the most ironic surprise of all.”

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The Wise Friend suggests more than shows.

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This is the second book of the series that started with Foundryside, one of the best fantasies of 2018.

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“brimming with verve and wisdom.”

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“Wendelboe’s main character is a survivor of the Great War, a one-eyed marshal in the manner of Rooster Cogburn, a little cantankerous, still remembering the horror of that war, but determi

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The book spins quickly into risk and danger, and the final chapters, fast-paced and dark with threat, provide one of the best manhunt and intended escape sequences of curr

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This short story collection by Newbery Award-winner Madeleine L’Engle, published posthumously by her granddaughter, is aimed more at L’Engle scholars and devoted fans than recreational readers fami

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