Fiction

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“a novel that explores the nostalgia, loneliness, guilt, and conflicted patriotism of the (fictitious) last American who worked at the facility.”

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“The story is alive; it breathes; every paragraph brings the reader a sense of being there, of being Carver.” 

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“Connelly spins a story in which the risk is life itself, and the collateral damage may be integrity.

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“A gender-flip version of Faust, and also a haunting love story that will linger.”

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“Word by word, Schwartz chooses her language with a surgeon’s precision. Her craftsmanship is a joy to behold.”

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“A powerful story of our earliest days as a species.”

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In style, story content, and characterization, Dracula’s Child is truly the sequel to Bram Stoker’s Dracula, succeeding where other, more famous attempts

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“with its attention to detail and swift narrative, fans of Mr.

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For devoted series fiction readers, the release of a new volume by a favored author is cause for the Happy Dance all the way to the nearest bookstore, library, or e-tailer.

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“Editor Melissa Edmundson has produced a valuable collection for scholars and curious readers alike.”

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“The quality and clarity of Ritt's writing and delivery are truly superb. Readers will feel like they're watching a movie.”

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Save the Last Dance demonstrates how strangers become family with their caring ways and unfailing faith in each other.”

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“Lovegrove has taken familiar characters from a much-loved story and created an intriguing maze with twists and turns and dead ends that all culminate in a surprise ending.”

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Laurie Moran is on the Long Island Expressway with her friend Charlotte Pierce heading to the South Shore Resort and Spa at the east end of the Hamptons for a long weekend.

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Mother for Dinner is a deeply uncomfortable novel. At times, it’s funny. At others, it’s a too-accurate examination of family ties. It’s also. . . about eating human flesh . . .

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wildly provocative, comical, and absorbing reading.

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Knee Deep lets itself be a story of solidarity, a tale about the glue that binds communities together, as told by the voice of a young one who, like us, the readers, is just wakin

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“Flip through the pages and find and remember the parts that will most challenge, inspire, delight. Find your own gems within Inside Story and treasure them.”

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“Grisham has a knack for throwing curves into the story that, with any other writer, could be distracting, but with Grisham every curve is woven into the story and builds the tension throug

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“With the tone and style of an old-fashioned murder noir, written from the female point of view, Fortune Favors the Dead is the beginning of a stellar period piece in a hard-boiled

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No doubt, Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter had a ton of fun writing this silly book of a couple dozen or more sentences with homophones, homonyms, and tricky punctuations.

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“Nesbo is always a great storyteller. The world he depicts is bleak and potentially depressing, but he presents it with relentless power.”

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“Mengiste and Akashic have done us a service by putting together this intriguing collection.”

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“A supernatural thriller that promises much at the outset but ultimately fails in its execution.”

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