Fiction

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“Any reader who is looking for a two-day page-turner would be right to pick up this book.”

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“Everett’s genius in James is that he keeps Twain’s essential plot along with Huck’s fundamental innocence and decency, but he adds his own nuances along the way.”

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“I liked my husband well enough . . . but I like him even better dead,” says Duchess Valencia Dedham.

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“Jump into this absurd and charming period mystery for the wild scenes of threat, battle, rescue, and humor, and make the most of the fun involved.”

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“Berman crafts a fast-paced thriller from gaming, app-building, and a reworking of the principles once offered to the American ‘hippie’ movement via a book called The Prophet.

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“It sounds like the opening of a joke: Four lawyers die in a plane crash.

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Nosy Neighbors is comforting as a cuddle, delightful as a favorite aunt, and filled with familiar characters who will remind you of people you know.

Illustrator(s):
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Toni Morrison was the first black editor in publishing, first Black female winner of the Pulitzer and Nobel prizes, author of Beloved, and all-around amazing person.

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“And I didn’t ask any questions,” the narrator of Nicola Solvinic’s debut mystery-thriller The Hunter’s Daughter, says in her first-person account of what it’s like having been raised by a

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“Oberländer’s underlying message of female bodies striving to conform to spaces too narrow to contain them is powerful . . .”

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“Matsumoto’s love for the rugged, wintry Japanese landscape is evident in his descriptions, which are verbal equivalents of traditional Japanese art . . .”

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“Deep in characterization and entertaining in its narrative, this book makes a very philosophical point about how well we are aware of those we consider ourselves close to . .

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“French, an unhurried and confident author, has always been willing to let her stories ease forward.

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Based on the saga of the Jews emerging from the Holocaust and their determination to inhabit a land to call their own, The Boy with the Star Tattoo by Talia Carner is an epic retelling of

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The Codger and the Sparrow portrays the slow burn of an improbable union of opposites that sees itself through multiple highs and lows to ultimat

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“Elisabeth’s rapid, aggressive, and dangerous actions do more than deal with one threat: They light a movement, in the name of the original Lilith, as well as in her own image.”

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“An entertaining story for those who love an exotic setting, an interesting mix of characters, and a lonely, tenacious heroine.”

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After Sappho is labeled as a novel although most of the characters presented actually existed and the words and actions ascribed to them are translated, paraphrased, quoted with minor alte

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“offers readers the complicated, rich dimensions of life in and outside of Iran and the wide diversity of people daring to fight for freedom . . .”

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“A book impossible to put down.”

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“Well-written with glorious descriptions, The Tree Doctor is a highly recommended tour de force.”

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“The Dead Years is probably best approached as a cozy for dog lovers who can tolerate a certain amount of graphic violence.”

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“Mix a pancake,

Stir a pancake,

Pop it in the pan,

Fry the pancake,

Toss the pancake—

Catch it if you can.”

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It’s impossible to discuss Lucas Rijneveld’s My Heavenly Favorite without discussing Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita. Told in an epistolary style from the perspective of the perpetrator

Author(s):
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“See this little dot?

It’s not

just a blot

on a page.”

Pages