Fiction

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Sometimes life can seem like a soap opera, and sometimes fact is stranger than fiction. Such is the case with the McNichol family.

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“a pithy, enjoyable, modern-day story from start to finish, with a cast of fully realized characters you’ll champion to the end.”

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This moving tale commences in the present time with Cassie Simmons, the assistant curator at the Maison François Baby House Museum in Windsor, Ontario, Canada.

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"‘Becoming the library, as if it were swallowing her whole . . . an infinite nothing—everything, a god—no, a place—which is it? . . . a realm, a guide, a library, a god.’"

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“This rendition of The Lady and the Unicorn is alive and relatable, reaching out to us from 500 years ago, and the reader will want to know more,

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“’Over my dead body will you go back to that land of demons and monsters. . . . Did you learn nothing from the past?’”

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We seldom find a book that we have hoped for like this one.

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“It's a masterful and unexpected bit of literary legerdemain illustrating fully why Camilla Sten’s novels of psychological suspense have become internationally acclaimed.”                  

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“zany fun”

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“Scottoline’s flawless plot twists create a reader’s bond with this scrambling, desperate dad with his newfound courage and hastily recruited allies.”

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“The lone deputy surrounded by a gang of outlaws determined to rescue their boss while a hostile town looks on may be a cliché, but Terence McCauley gives it several twists.”

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“With a gentle hand, Ella Shane draws back the curtain revealing that crime does exist in her world, while at the same time showing that goodness and mercy also abide.”

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“a page-turner . . . the two stories intertwine ingeniously.”

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It must be heartbreaking to lose your husband and the child you're carrying. Amelia Baumann is still dealing with the trauma of her loss. Though some time has passed, her wounds are not healed.

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How Strange a Season contains six short stories and a novella plus a seventh short story that follows the novella and could have been included in it.

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The world in which Geoffrey Chaucer created his considerable body of writing often painted women as the gateway of the devil, insatiable sexual monsters who consumed their men with their crude, las

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“Readers may . . . close the book believing that with a little magic, a family may be able to survive all the hardships to create their own little happy ever after.

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“a deeply charming story full of complex insights delivered from a simple, humanistic point of view . . .”

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“DeYoung has taken a familiar end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it theme and made it something uniquely his own.”

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Be Thankful for Trees is for young kids in first and second grade. It’s broken into sections, the first section being A tree is food.  “Would life be satisfying without trees?

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One Italian Summer tells a story of grand proportions in which love transcends all things.

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Eternal is a heart-wrenching but ultimately triumphant novel of friendship, love, and loss that will take the reader on a journey to the past while leaving many questions to ponde

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At first glance, the new novel by Anne Tyler, French Braid, breaks all the rules of exemplary fiction.

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“As compelling as it is informative and as entertaining as it is terrifying, the novel The Able Archers is a great read and highly recommended.”

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A gifted linguistics professor who is fascinated by such extinct languages as Old Norse and Old Danish, Val Chesterfield is so frightened of the world that she has immured herself at the university

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