Literary Fiction

Reviewed by: 

Every year, there is a pilgrimage (of sorts).

“Sometimes the highway doesn’t take you all that far.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Yaara Shehori’s novel Aquarium follows the lives of sisters Dori and Lili Ackerman, apparently deaf children being raised by deaf parents in relative poverty in a nameless country in some

Reviewed by: 

Readers can count on bestselling author Jessica Anya Blau for a breezy coming-of-age story about a nice, middle-class, teenage girl who learns about life during a tumultuous summer with an offbeat

Of Women and Salt is a beautifully written novel that turns like a kaleidoscope in the light, illuminating the blurry delineation of who is an insider and who an outsider.”

Reviewed by: 

Jessie van Eerden has created a surprising protagonist and a moving story full of unexpected moments that never stretch into the bizarre or unrealistic.

Reviewed by: 

Leonora in the Morning Light is less a story about love, and more a story about finding your own authentic voice.

Reviewed by: 

As quietly as snow falling on “every tip of the picket fence that leaned drunkenly toward the road, . . .

Reviewed by: 

In Marisa Silver’s book, The Mysteries, she tackles the conundrum of relationships—of family, of friends, of children, of adults. And therein lies the mystery of the title.

Reviewed by: 

This book is a good example of how packaging and promotion can hit or miss with an audience.

Reviewed by: 

“For those who want a close-up portrait of a complex society with a rich history and plenty of contradictions, My Old Home is an excellent place to begin.”

Reviewed by: 

The question of literature composed in a second language is a vexed and interesting one.

Reviewed by: 

“Nava is an impassioned writer who has once again created a fascinating picture of Los Angeles at an earlier, less enlightened time, centering on gay men trying to shed the shame they have

Reviewed by: 

Lynette’s alarm goes off at 3:15 a.m. She is 30 years old. She wears ten-year-old sweats and wool socks to bed. Her room’s warmth depends on a portable heater; it doesn’t work very well.

Reviewed by: 

“A unique and heartfelt story that taps into an uncommon family dynamic, showcasing how love is resilient and healing, even among the broken and the brokenhearted.”

Reviewed by: 

“In its winding subterranean travelogue, and profoundly evocative, allegorical blues surrealism, The Man Who Lived Underground reads less like a follow-up to Wright’s naturalist

Reviewed by: 

Jacob Dinezon (1851–1919) has been a commanding figure in late 19th century Eastern European Jewish literature.

Reviewed by: 

“While unpolished in places, Open Water is the work of a talented and promising young writer.”

Reviewed by: 

“Sathian, who writes with great assurance and verve, wields her pen like a magnifying lens to examine the foibles of immigrants who are high achievers but somewhat insular and insecure.”

Reviewed by: 

“With such dark and treacherous secrets, the men of The Lamplighters echo the force of the seas around them.

Reviewed by: 

The Twilight Zone is a novel about the long and brutal dictatorship led by Augusto Pinochet in Chile from 1973 to 1990, yes.

Reviewed by: 

Most historians agree that the Reconstruction—the attempt to build a more equitable country following the Civil War—ultimately failed.

Reviewed by: 

Ilana Masad’s debut novel All My Mother’s Lovers is an in-depth exploration of family dynamics, the miscommunications and resentments that sometimes span lifetimes, and the moments of rede

Reviewed by: 

Klara and the Sun is about families, about the future of work, about disability and the nature of (post) humanity.

Pages