Literary Fiction

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Caleb Johnson’s debut, Treeborne, is a story about a family living in Elberta, Alabama, where a parcel of land, 700 acres in total, arouses deep emotions as it’s about to be flooded over w

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With the publication of Chinua Achebe’s remarkable novel, Things Fall Apart, in 1958, the English speaking world was introduced to Nigerian literature.

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This is an ambitious author. His is a marvel-filled book.

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South African born Jewish-Canadian author Kenneth Bonert’s sophomore effort The Mandela Plot is a sequel to his multiple awards winning debut novel The Lion Seeker (also reviewed

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In these days of nasty name-calling passing as humor there is thankfully one true practitioner of the literary art of satire still standing, and Christopher Buckley’s second historical novel proves

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Patrick “Pack” Walsh may not know exactly where he’s going in life, but he’s happy where he is. He’s got a girlfriend who gets him. His single dad is his best friend.

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When you’re a cop, it’s darn hard to get a real day off. Dave Cubiak, Door County sheriff way up on Lake Michigan in Wisconsin, thinks he finally can enjoy himself on a perfect summer afternoon.

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Gonzalo Gil is a middle-aged attorney with a failing career, a fractured marriage, and a domineering father-in-law who wants him to give up his practice and work for his own powerful firm, which is

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Martha's Vineyard is the setting for this intriguing thriller. Glass blower Kat Weber just sold one of her creations, receiving a fortune for it.

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Books about goddesses are generally lyrical, lovely—and flat. Tabloid reflections of the mindless, wealthy, beautiful women who laze around the pool at expensive spas.

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“a subdued chiller relating how death brings a circle of events to a halt, only to begin once more when a spirit regains admittance into the living world.”

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Sarah Winman's third novel, Tin Man, begins in 1950 in rural Oxfordshire, when a pregnant housewife, Dora, disobeys her husband by choosing a painting over a bottle of whisky at a charity

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Thoreau’s observation that “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation” comes to mind while reading William Trevor’s short stories.

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“Ondaatje has spun a dazzling tale that lingers long after the book is closed.”  

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Shadow Child is a detective story set in 1960s Manhattan, and also a historical saga of a Japanese-American woman during World War II, and also a tale of teen rivalry, which shifts from pa

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“an exciting foray into an ancient crime, with a likeable, intelligent heroine . . .”

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John Cyrus Bellman—widower, farmer, and father to a ten-year-old daughter—seems to surprise even himself one day when he decides to leave everything behind to head west in search of “a creature ent

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“witty, satirical, and hilarious with a delicious quiver of crime noir hovering over all”

A pretty girl, a bartender, and a deadly snake meet up in a bar . . .

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For roughly three years, between ages 37 and 40, the unnamed narrator of Motherhood—a Canadian writer living with her long-term boyfriend, Miles, a criminal defense lawyer—debates whether

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“If family is our path to hell, it can also be our path to salvation.”

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“a different kind of story of a girl and her dog.”

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“Absurdly compelling, packing a double barrel blast . . .”

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A new novel by Julian Barnes is exciting.

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“A different kind of detective story, The Spirit Photographer is an American gothic novel set in a time of post-war turmoil.”

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Alan Hollinghurst’s novel, The Sparsholt Affair, presents a bit of a conundrum.

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