Literary Fiction

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“a deeply charming story full of complex insights delivered from a simple, humanistic point of view . . .”

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“In The Town of Babylon, Alejandro Varela, whose educational background is in public health, combines a social scientist’s powers of observation and analysis with a master writer’s

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“a carefully crafted work of fiction that makes good writing seem easy.”

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Family and home: They’re the grounding of this novel and of humanity.”

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All Come to Dust is one of the best African mysteries of the year.”

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Eleutheria . . .

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“soars on the strength of language and passion for the ideas [the author] works hard to depict here, so that if you loved The Sympathizer, and you don’t mind the insistent history

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Isabel Allende is a wonderful storyteller. Her distinct voice and her vivid imagination have delighted readers for many years now.

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“Pankaj Mishra’s new novel is no less stimulating and insightful than anything else he has written, although there’s no tightly hewn plot here—and the drama that matters is internal.”

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“Past and present, fact and fiction loop and intersect, echoes of history filter into modern life . . .”

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“a tale of love—platonic, familial, romantic—and of forgiveness and growth, along with acceptance of what life doles out.”

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One of the joys of reading literature is discovering an astute author’s powers of observation and finding these deliciously woven throughout the narrative.

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“a fascinating piece of writing from a master storyteller”

New Year is a novel about uncontrollable panic, repressed trauma, and the psychological patterns that persist in their aftermath.

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“Ultimately, Perpetual West is an engaging tapestry of ideas.”

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Hidden women abound in all sectors of society, nearly all cultures, and throughout history, threatening powerful, dominant men who fear losing their power and prestige.

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To Paradise illustrates the power of narrative to make sense of our chaotic lives and even to endow them with beauty.

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“This is Joella’s first novel, and it’s an assured performance, full of nicely observed detail. It may not have a Big Theme, but it has lots and lots of heart.”

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“succeeds, thanks to Seckin’s unrelentingly honest excavations and sharply beautiful language.”

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Louise Nealon has been, fairly and unfairly, compared to Sally Rooney, and with her first novel, Snowflake, she seems poised for prizes and movie adaptations.

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Tell Me How to Be . . . offers one view of what it is like to be an Indian American in contemporary America.”

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Medusa’s Ankles opens with a haunting and strangely gentle ghost story (‘A July Ghost’) and ends with a terse contemporary fable about our feckless destruction of the planet (‘Sea

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“at a single-word turning point the context shifts and all previous assumptions are cast aside . . .”

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Small Things Like These is a succinct, heart and soul story of a man coming to terms with a consciousness born of his personal narrative.

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“Owen is a master storyteller and creator of consistent plotting and pacing, seamlessly navigated with characters that are real flesh and blood, and sometimes deeply flawed.”

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