Literary Fiction

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“every story in the collection is beautifully constructed, consisting of elegant, at times lyrical prose, is engaging, and is propelled by a compelling, astute narrative voice.”

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The Lioness of Boston is a captivating story of a significant woman in Boston’s history who left that city a cultural legacy to last the ages.”

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“A book about how history repeats itself . . .”

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“Cleeton’s characters offer a beautiful pairing of tenderness and passion, anger and revenge, courage and resolution.”

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White Cat, Black Dog enchants—but beware, the underlying darkness is deep and very real.”

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“The stakes get higher with the possibility of bringing back the pollinators and, literally, saving the world, and the story hurtles along in its final chapters.”

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It all adds up to a slightly nasty book whose pages turn easily . . .”

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Debut novels are often overlooked by avid readers because of the wealth of works by well-known authors. This one should not be.

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It is 1963, and Beatrix Thompson is reminiscing about the past few decades of her life, particularly when she spent time in America.

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“so layered and deft—and, ultimately, engaging—this book seems certain to advance Catton’s already considerable reputation as a major literary talent.”

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Kiran Millwood Hargrave’s The Dance Tree tells more than it shows.

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“Melinda Moustakis’ arrestingly vivid and richly realized new novel Homestead depicts the interior lives of two Alaskan homesteaders in the 1950s so convincingly that it often read

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“Like in the best comedy, Goddard disguises some of our deepest and hardest truths in jokes that make us both laugh and then . . .

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The Laughter is a brilliant, totally absorbing character study.”

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“For readers, writers, immigrants, patriots, and expatriates the world over, Darkness by Bharati Mukherjee is a study in excellence of a short story’s highest achievement.”

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a poignant tale that doesn’t shy from sharp edges, a universal story both timeless and timely.”

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A tale to please YA readers and well beyond, it’s a poignant story that doesn’t shy from sharp edges, universal, timeless, and timely.”

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“Rushdie’s Victory City is another fabulous novel set in his native India, even if it doesn’t reach the heights of Midnight’s Children.”

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“Haynes is a perceptive writer, and you’ll likely find yourself agreeing with her interpretation of the Medusa myth.”

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“Hats were to be kept on at lunch, but not worn in the evening. Nothing that sparkled before sunset. No white shoes after Labor Day.

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“this novel asks one of humanity’s most important questions . . .”

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After Sappho is a women’s text in that it is non-linear, non-hierarchical, multi-voiced, innovative, and highly creative and original.”

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The Mitford Affair, an historical novel, begins in July 1932 and follows the aristocratic Mitford family through April 1941, as Britain recovers from World War I and reluctantly plunges in

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“Ash is such a compelling, if disturbing, character, and Hall’s writing is so eloquent that Glitterland is more substantial than the usual gay romcom.”

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“paints the conflicts and stories that define the ordinary and memorable, finely etched with myriad details, that altogether reflect back on the readers’ essential humanity.”

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