Literary Fiction

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Leonora in the Morning Light is less a story about love, and more a story about finding your own authentic voice.

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As quietly as snow falling on “every tip of the picket fence that leaned drunkenly toward the road, . . .

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This book is a good example of how packaging and promotion can hit or miss with an audience.

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In Marisa Silver’s book, The Mysteries, she tackles the conundrum of relationships—of family, of friends, of children, of adults. And therein lies the mystery of the title.

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“For those who want a close-up portrait of a complex society with a rich history and plenty of contradictions, My Old Home is an excellent place to begin.”

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The question of literature composed in a second language is a vexed and interesting one.

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“Nava is an impassioned writer who has once again created a fascinating picture of Los Angeles at an earlier, less enlightened time, centering on gay men trying to shed the shame they have

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Lynette’s alarm goes off at 3:15 a.m. She is 30 years old. She wears ten-year-old sweats and wool socks to bed. Her room’s warmth depends on a portable heater; it doesn’t work very well.

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“A unique and heartfelt story that taps into an uncommon family dynamic, showcasing how love is resilient and healing, even among the broken and the brokenhearted.”

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“In its winding subterranean travelogue, and profoundly evocative, allegorical blues surrealism, The Man Who Lived Underground reads less like a follow-up to Wright’s naturalist

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Jacob Dinezon (1851–1919) has been a commanding figure in late 19th century Eastern European Jewish literature.

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“Sathian, who writes with great assurance and verve, wields her pen like a magnifying lens to examine the foibles of immigrants who are high achievers but somewhat insular and insecure.”

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“While unpolished in places, Open Water is the work of a talented and promising young writer.”

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“With such dark and treacherous secrets, the men of The Lamplighters echo the force of the seas around them.

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The Twilight Zone is a novel about the long and brutal dictatorship led by Augusto Pinochet in Chile from 1973 to 1990, yes.

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Most historians agree that the Reconstruction—the attempt to build a more equitable country following the Civil War—ultimately failed.

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Ilana Masad’s debut novel All My Mother’s Lovers is an in-depth exploration of family dynamics, the miscommunications and resentments that sometimes span lifetimes, and the moments of rede

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Klara and the Sun is about families, about the future of work, about disability and the nature of (post) humanity.

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This collection is not easy to approach because of the different realities and forms of expression it uses—and they might have been useful had they prompted deeper reflections. But not.

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When a writer decides to base his novel’s plot around a middle-class Jewish kid’s coming of age adventure on Long Island in 1970, it’s not a promising sign.

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“a coming-of-age novel rich in Americana.”

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“Gianrico Carofiglio’s Three O’Clock in the Morning is profound in its simple delivery.”

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“an incredibly strong debut that hits a number of sweet spots—feminist literature, dystopian/speculative fiction, and young adult literature. It’s well worth your time.”

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How Beautiful We Were is a masterful piece of storytelling with multiple storylines . . .”

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