Women’s Fiction

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“It does not take long for Marlena to realize that her loving husband is a man of many demands, and she wonders if tragedy happens in threes.”

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When Emma London was ten, her mother committed suicide. Her paternal grandmother, Genevieve, took her in to raise her.

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“Blurring the line between history and myth, Delayed Rays of a Star is encyclopedic in its detail and fit to bursting with invention.”

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Karen Dukess draws the world of the New York literary scene in the 1980s—and the landscape its players inhabit—so vividly that readers will imagine they have experienced e

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“‘. . . in today’s historiography, where the focus on the individual is once again becoming stronger, it’s actually better for a forgotten artist to have been a woman than a man.

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How Could She is a poignant, relatable and, at times, terribly funny, novel about female friendship . . .”

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Many people go through the empty-nest syndrome when their children leave home. Some look forward to their newfound freedom, but some become depressed.

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“Lesley Kara’s The Rumor is a brisk and smartly written mystery about women, the intricacies of their social circle, and secrets that, if revealed, may have deadly consequences.”

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Sixteen-year-old Brin Collins believes her life is falling apart. It all began when Delia, her mother got pregnant.

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“Etter has created that rare beast: an effective, startling poetic novel. Its story is coherent and progressive; Cassie herself is intensely sympathetic.

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“Sager fans and new readers alike will enjoy this heart-pounding thriller that cleverly weaves economic anxiety with something a whole lot darker.”

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Temper is one hell of a ride. Fargo’s writing is direct and crisp, and her characters mesmerize.

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“Nancy Thayer, recognized for her enchanting beach reads, goes above and beyond with Surfside Sisters by offering a compelling and more spirited book than the usual summer novel.”

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Emilie Richards is well known for penning engaging tales.

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In The Dream Daughter, time travel, the Vietnam War, North Carolina, and the modern digital world are all backdrop for a mother’s connection with and devotion to her unborn child.

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“suspense-filled action comprised of secretive activities, vengeance, murder, envy, and iniquity that is sure to whet the appetite of true lovers of psychological thrillers.”

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“At times The Mother-In-Law reads more like a character study of two very different women than a mystery, yet every page pulsates with Sally Hepworth’s skill in getting inside the

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Baby boomers and lovers of the Massachusetts islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket can reminisce over the year of 1969 when the younger generation was feeling their oats through f

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Avery Greer always thought she'd leave her coastal hometown of Littleport, Maine, but she is still there. When she was 14, her parents died in a car crash, from which her grandmother s

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“Against all odds, this is a feel-good novel.”

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It is mid-August and tropical storm Noelle is forecast to make landfall on the east coast of the U.S. with a dire prediction of turning into a massive and destructive hurricane.

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“Sisters of Summer's End is a passionate, sensual, and steamy novel.

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In the past 80-plus years much has changed in the world, in industry, social norms, and the way people now act and think.

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Elise Sorenson is a dressage rider.

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