Graphic Novels & Comics

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“It has never been easier to make a great living doing what you love. But to make it happen, first you need an EVIL PLAN.

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Lunch Lady and the Summer Camp Shakedown opens with Lunch Lady having her van stolen, which makes it difficult to discern if this is part of the tale, or the briefing of a background story

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Chances are if you’re reading this you’re not what one might consider a comics reader . . . “typical” or otherwise.

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Graphic novel versions of the classics almost always stir up some controversy, particularly when it’s Shakespeare who is being adapted.

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Ian Rankin is best known and often lauded for his Rebus series of crime fiction novels set in Edinburgh. He’s written relatively few standalones to date.

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My first shock with comics occurred in the seventies. I was under the ominous grasp of a winter flu when my mother decided to take me to the doctor.

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In X’ed Out, artist and writer Charles Burns returns to many of the themes and images that made his magnum opus, Black Hole, both a pleasure and a challenge to read.

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The title says it all. Shake, Rattle and Turn That Noise Down! How Elvis Shook Up Music, Me and Mom is a true story straight from author-cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty’s boyhood.

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The title of Millicent Borges Accardi’s poetry chapbook, Woman on a Shaky Bridge, does not come from any of the lines of the 16 poems in this collection but rather from its preface, which

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Of the three Vertigo Crime graphic novels I’ve read to date, The Chill is by far my favorite. From the subject matter to the writing to the art, the whole package just works.

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Ghostopolis is perfect proof that a graphic novel can tell as solid and detailed a story as a more traditional novel—and the fact that it’s aimed at kids and still manages this feat makes

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Filthy Rich is the first graphic novel to come from the newly launched Vertigo Crime imprint at DC Comics.

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First time novelist L. M. Preston succeeds in writing a book boys will want to read. Not an easy task when 12-year-olds are more captivated by a flashing screen than a stationary page.

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