Graphic Novels & Comics

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“. . . exemplify[ies] the universal appeal that marks the heart of science fiction.”

Boxers and Saints is Gene Luen Yang’s newest two-volume graphic novel showing two opposing perspectives from the Boxer Rebellion.

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Bill Everett was an artistic chameleon and an imaginative writer who could handle any assignment thrown his way.

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In the months prior to America being dragged into the Second World War, the country was filled with undercover agents from Germany and other foreign lands.

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“. . . wonderfully scary stories . . . told with such beauty and wit you regret when they end.”

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The myths and stories a society embraces speak volumes about what that society really is.

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An amusement park is a wonderful, magical place where childhood memories can be built.

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“. . . the best of an American art form . . .”

“. . . the kind of book that teachers, librarians, and booksellers will be talking about all summer.”

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“. . . a delight for all, capturing the best of comics, film, and modern media in one four-color classic.”

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“. . . opens up the world of heroes to everyone . . .”

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“. . . the artist fills every panel with joy.”

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“A timeless classic from the pages of period long gone, . . . pure, classic art with a touch of vaudeville and slapstick.”

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“Mr. Barks distills pure comedy down to its simplest form.”

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“. . . a volume of touching sincerity . . .”

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While female comic artists had been working regularly in newspaper comic sections for quite some time, the 1940 debut of Brenda Starr, Reporter was something brand new.

“. . . a wonderful volume at a very attractive price point . . .”

In February 1986, gaming took a new turn with the release of The Legend of Zelda.

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Inside Pogo artist and writer Walt Kelly brings us an imaginative world that equals anything ever created by Lewis Carroll, L. Frank Baum, or J. M. Barrie.

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For a team known mostly for incredible violence, reckless abandon, and general stupidity, the stories reprinted in this hardcover collection are can only be described in one word: charming

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“. . . over 260 pages of pure artistic and comic bliss.”

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“Nearly 100 years after it first saw print, Krazy Kat is still incredibly funny.”

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