Graphic Novels & Comics

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“. . . a volume of touching sincerity . . .”

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While female comic artists had been working regularly in newspaper comic sections for quite some time, the 1940 debut of Brenda Starr, Reporter was something brand new.

“. . . a wonderful volume at a very attractive price point . . .”

In February 1986, gaming took a new turn with the release of The Legend of Zelda.

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Inside Pogo artist and writer Walt Kelly brings us an imaginative world that equals anything ever created by Lewis Carroll, L. Frank Baum, or J. M. Barrie.

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For a team known mostly for incredible violence, reckless abandon, and general stupidity, the stories reprinted in this hardcover collection are can only be described in one word: charming

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“. . . over 260 pages of pure artistic and comic bliss.”

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“Nearly 100 years after it first saw print, Krazy Kat is still incredibly funny.”

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There are questions inherent to the world of comics easily explained and often, thanks to the inventiveness of writers such as John Byrne, Jack Kirby, John Broome, and Steve Ditko, quite logical in

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“If you love the frustrated, quacking, crazed Donald from the cartoons of the forties, you have to read A Christmas for Shacktown.”

“Every page is another revelation . . . a fantastically enjoyable ride . . .”

Horror comic fans rejoice!

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“Orion is Pirates of the Caribbean for the adult fantasy world.”

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“It isn’t easy to write a character with 80 years of continuity while simultaneously pleasing old fans and drawing in new ones, but Will Murray does it.”

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“In our hearts and minds, childhood is eternal. And so is Skippy.”

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“. . . a totally unique and immersive reading experience.”

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“Rick Geary is one of our best and most consistent graphic novelists. Lovers’ Lane is further proof.”

“. . . a most delectable appetizer.”

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“. . . moving storytelling of the highest order.”

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