Graphic Novels & Comics

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The myths and stories a society embraces speak volumes about what that society really is.

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An amusement park is a wonderful, magical place where childhood memories can be built.

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“. . . the best of an American art form . . .”

“. . . the kind of book that teachers, librarians, and booksellers will be talking about all summer.”

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“. . . a delight for all, capturing the best of comics, film, and modern media in one four-color classic.”

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“. . . opens up the world of heroes to everyone . . .”

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“. . . the artist fills every panel with joy.”

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“A timeless classic from the pages of period long gone, . . . pure, classic art with a touch of vaudeville and slapstick.”

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“Mr. Barks distills pure comedy down to its simplest form.”

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“. . . a volume of touching sincerity . . .”

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While female comic artists had been working regularly in newspaper comic sections for quite some time, the 1940 debut of Brenda Starr, Reporter was something brand new.

“. . . a wonderful volume at a very attractive price point . . .”

In February 1986, gaming took a new turn with the release of The Legend of Zelda.

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Inside Pogo artist and writer Walt Kelly brings us an imaginative world that equals anything ever created by Lewis Carroll, L. Frank Baum, or J. M. Barrie.

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For a team known mostly for incredible violence, reckless abandon, and general stupidity, the stories reprinted in this hardcover collection are can only be described in one word: charming

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“. . . over 260 pages of pure artistic and comic bliss.”

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“Nearly 100 years after it first saw print, Krazy Kat is still incredibly funny.”

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There are questions inherent to the world of comics easily explained and often, thanks to the inventiveness of writers such as John Byrne, Jack Kirby, John Broome, and Steve Ditko, quite logical in

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“If you love the frustrated, quacking, crazed Donald from the cartoons of the forties, you have to read A Christmas for Shacktown.”

“Every page is another revelation . . . a fantastically enjoyable ride . . .”

Horror comic fans rejoice!

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