Contemporary

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In a nation of immigrants, at a time when immigration is the hot topic, it is refreshing to read a novel in which hyphenated Americans have a chance, without political scrutiny, to express the tug

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Three-dimensional chess barely conveys the multiple levels, breadth, and ambition that comprise Book of Numbers, Joshua Cohen’s epic of the Internet age and fourth novel.

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“a compelling read, an unflinching exploration of one of life’s most inexplicable horrors.” 

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“Sometimes the world tells you to do something new.”

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“a perfect summer read.”

The Sweetheart Deal is a solid first novel by Polly Dugan, which in spite of the sweetness of the title, never strays toward sappiness.

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“This is a novel for the bold of heart.”

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“Gritty and very realistic in places, this is a joyful, rewarding read.”

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The Festival of Insignificance, 86 year old Czech-French writer Milan Kundera’s new and possibly last work of fiction after a 13-year hiatus, presents many of the features—a thin plot and

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“I was beaten with a baseball bat in front of my students. My dog committed suicide.

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Small towns are known for their residents being privy to everyone's business, and this is especially true in this novel set in Nantucket.

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"Well worth reading!"

“. . . the issue was that even though all he wanted was for everyone to be happy, he kept doing things that made people unhappy.”

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This is a superb novel: luminous and illuminating. You’ll gallop through every page and then read it again. British author Sarah Hall is a writer’s writer . . . as well as a reader’s best friend.

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“airy, romantic chick lit . . . but beware of trigger themes treated with . . . lightness.”

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Once again we are invited to the quaint, fictitious seacoast town of Marshbury, Massachusetts, and into the lives of the Irish close-knit Hurilhy family.

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But for a few years in the early nineties, when a combination of big new rackets, big new servers, dogmatic coaching, and fast courts made it all rather boring (for spectators and, quite possibly,

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It’s summertime, so the living should be easy, right? Well, not so much for Sophie Anderson, the heroine of Nancy Thayer’s new beach book, The Guest Cottage.

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Kate Atkinson is a brilliant novelist, an historian, a tease, a practical joker; she’s empathetic, adventuresome, erudite. By now she's also probably quite wealthy . . . and with good reason.

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“It’s likely that Atkinson is looking at another award winner with A God in Ruins.”

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Images are so clear it’s hard to believe you’re not in the story yourself, and people are so well drawn you’d swear you know them personally.”

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“lovely . . .”

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“Brendan Duffy keeps readers on a rollercoaster of mystery and suspense, saving the best for last.”

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“I simply wanted to be left alone.” Those words are spoken by Father Odran Yates, the main character and narrator in John Boyne’s novel, A History of Loneliness.

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“How glibly addicts deceive themselves.”

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“compelling and masterful”

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“Those were certainly the good old days.”

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