Literary Fiction

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

The Caretaker stands shoulder-to-shoulder with the multiple award-winning books in Ron Rash’s impressive body of work.”

Reviewed by: 

This richly textured narrative whipsaws the reader between the 14th and 21st centuries.

Reviewed by: 

The Fraud is a brilliant pastiche. It is clever, often entertaining, well-researched . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There is something to be said about a book that has survived the test of time. Sweetbitter was first published in 1995 by Broken Moon Press.

Reviewed by: 

Sean Michaels was the winner of the Scotiabank Giller Prize for his debut novel Us Conductors.

Reviewed by: 

graceful and eloquent and compelling.”

Reviewed by: 

"The turnabout in Dubus’ new book is a realization by Lowe that the pit is of his own making, and he has to climb out of it himself—via acts of kindness and consideration."

Reviewed by: 

Readers and critics alike know that Paul Murray is a natural storyteller.

Reviewed by: 

The first of Ebru Ojen’s works to be translated from Turkish to English, Lojman conducts an unflinching taxonomy of a family’s descent to oblivion.

With a truly imaginative structure, Alice Hoffman delves into what has become her trademark theme of magic.

Reviewed by: 

Richard Kluger’s Hamlet’s Children is a fantastic piece of historical fiction that is so believable one would think that the story is actually true. The author’s style is unique.

Reviewed by: 

"biting humor . . . a sharp send-up of academic life . . ."

Reviewed by: 

A beautiful woman with a sordid past, Arabella Yarrington began her ascent into the highest levels of society from the depths of a ramshackle cabin in Alabama where she lived with her widowed mothe

Reviewed by: 

“Richard Russo once again brings to life a world of closely connected, interdependent-in-spite-of-themselves characters who feel remarkably familiar and gut-bustingly real.”

Reviewed by: 

“The structure of Tom Lake is wonderfully measured as Patchett weaves the fine details of dual timelines together. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Hadley’s understanding of her characters is complemented by her clear and lucid prose.”

Reviewed by: 

At first glance, Patrick DeWitt’s latest novel, The Librarianist, seems like yet another heart-warming curmudgeon-rediscovers-his-humanity story (see A Man Called Ove or The S

Reviewed by: 

"the portrait of an artist as a young woman."

Reviewed by: 

“Fleet, funny, and perceptive, I Meant It Once entertains even as it contemplates what people actually mean to each other, and what it all means.”

Reviewed by: 

“The use of two first-person narratives gives Tapper the opportunity to tell two parallel stories that eventually grow together at the end of the story.”

Reviewed by: 

I Am Homeless If This Is Not My Home might be described as a necroscape or “the big adieu,” with dying and dead characters sprinkled liberally throughout the three interspersed plots.

Reviewed by: 

“Dead Drop is a must-read for fans of realistic, intricately plotted espionage fiction.”

Reviewed by: 

“Mihret Sibhat’s command of language, her sense of humor, and her love for Ethiopia combine to stir the memories of any who have encountered this culture and people.”

Reviewed by: 

"An impressive feat of creativity, part storytelling, part invented anthropology, layered together to give a deeper sense of reality."

Pages