Literary Fiction

Reviewed by: 

After Sappho is labeled as a novel although most of the characters presented actually existed and the words and actions ascribed to them are translated, paraphrased, quoted with minor alte

Reviewed by: 

“portrays a woman of great intellect, beauty, and ability to read others, whose desire for power forms not for her own glory but to challenge a system that threatens her son’s life.”

Reviewed by: 

It’s impossible to discuss Lucas Rijneveld’s My Heavenly Favorite without discussing Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita. Told in an epistolary style from the perspective of the perpetrator

Reviewed by: 

“Most of the stories in Dublin Tales show off Irish literature at its best: overflowing with feeling, humor, and insight.

Reviewed by: 

“With Pelecanos’ longstanding care for the humanity, even among the most desperate and downtrodden, Owning Up is about the ripple effects and long-term ramifications of crime or tr

Reviewed by: 

“Author Hisashi Kashiwai is able to craft beautiful, heartfelt stories for his characters . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“If you want plot, read James Patterson. If you want to think, this is the book for you.”

Reviewed by: 

“Part love story, part adventure, and part mystery, The Fox Wife is an enjoyable excursion into the beliefs and life in the China of 120 years ago.”

Reviewed by: 

Ways and Means is an amazing debut novel from a prodigiously gifted young writer. . . . virtuosic storytelling.”

Reviewed by: 

“Wherever he takes you—to the steamy summers of the Deep South, to dingy bars and squalid dwellings, or to fragrant cherry orchards by a lake near Bigfork—Burke makes everything come to lif

Reviewed by: 

The Djinn Waits a Hundred Years is a wonderful love story, an engaging mystery expertly written and told, about loss and love . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Bekono captures Salomé’s narrative voice.

Reviewed by: 

For the history lesson alone, Cold Victory is memorable.”

Reviewed by: 

“the plot of Blizzard is compulsive enough to carry it through to the end. The age-old question of what happens next compels the turning of the page.”

Reviewed by: 

“weaves all these stories and characters into a tapestry of believability that is well-crafted, suspenseful, and satisfying.”

Reviewed by: 

“Maybe Antarctica could teach us all not to surrender to despair, to keep investing in a world of and beyond ourselves.”

Reviewed by: 

“As always, Matar’s writing is elegant and metaphorically rich, filled with carefully drawn portraits of Khaled and his intelligent, highly articulate friends and dramatic renderings of the

Reviewed by: 

The Derelict Light, environmental journalist Mike Stark’s first novel, is a character study of Astoria, Oregon, a small, dreary town on the Columbia River just miles from the Pacific Ocean

Reviewed by: 

“Quite simply it is dazzling.”

Reviewed by: 

“Louise Kennedy’s brass tack writing takes center stage in each of her haunting short stories.

Reviewed by: 

“singular Paul Lynch, the prophet raging at the wickedness and sorrow in the world, warning us that the road to redemption travels through compassion and love, but it surely is not an easy

Reviewed by: 

Can a woman of 60 just be coming of age?

Better late than never.

Reviewed by: 

Many succumbed to the mesmerizing prose of Paul Auster 40 years ago when he was writing about his emotionally distant father. Auster was then only 35.

Reviewed by: 

“above all, The Vulnerables, like many of Sigrid Nunez’s other exceptional writings, is about what it means to be human.”

Reviewed by: 

“Amanda Peters writes with beautiful simplicity. What a joy to read fiction that isn’t cluttered with unnecessary twists and turns and verbiage.”

Pages