Literary Fiction

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It’s 2016, Mumbai.

“I cannot stop this moving train,” says Sharifa who has returned to the country of her childhood, India, with her husband and their seven-year-old daughter, Zee.

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wildly provocative, comical, and absorbing reading.

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“Flip through the pages and find and remember the parts that will most challenge, inspire, delight. Find your own gems within Inside Story and treasure them.”

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“With exceptional precision, concision, grace, wisdom, and insight Nicole Krauss creates a magnificent collection of stories that explore what the narrator effectively asks her son in the l

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“The story should suit fans of romance, historical fiction, westerns, and anyone who loves a straightforward adventure tale about decent people striving together to overcome hardship.”

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Can a novel be about a moment? About a group of people, unique and familiar at the same time, living through that moment that doesn’t yet have a name or any one specific date?

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“has greater resonance, the characters are older, have lived more, have more to say. As a result, the stories are . . . more rewarding . . .”

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“within these pages, there are passages that approach the sublime. There is pain, anguish, horror, and sadness, alongside passages of subtle human feelings conveyed without words.

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“enjoy the complex characters drawn with beautiful prose and flashes of humor . . .”

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“Graham Swift has a remarkable ability to slip back and forth in time, while identifying the many small incidents and markers that shape and reshape the lives of his characters.”

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The fourth book in Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead cycle features Jack Boughton, the prodigal son of the Presbyterian minister, Robert Boughton.

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“The denouement ties life, love, and mystery together, as all excellent murder mysteries do.”

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“To find meaning and humanity in confusing times and to convey that understanding to the reader is the ultimate gift a writer can provide.”

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1986. Fulgencio Ramirez, a pharmacist in a border town called La Frontera, reads the obit section every morning, waiting for a man to die so he can move in and scoop up his wife.

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Miss Iceland is a beautiful novel about artistic aspiration and friendship. The storytelling sparkles . . .”

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“The Boy in the Field is a literary mystery novel. . . . Just not the kind that focuses on what happens on a patch of land, a highway, or even a country.

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Beneficence, Meredith Hall’s first novel, appears 13 years after her prize-winning memoir Without a Map.

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“deeply evocative, eminently readable . . .”

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“Accept that you might have conventional horizons. Stop asking for life to be a poem. Why is it so difficult to speak plainly without allusions to books, films, and art?”

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“Like with the best plot-driven novels, you need to know what happens at the end. Like with the best character-driven novels, you bleed with them along the way.”

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The Paris Children is a page-turning and inspiring story of how courage and family ties can survive even the worst of evil.”

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“although McNally’s stories seem unbelievable at first, they throb with a recognizable human heartbeat, powered by love and regret and the mystery of life.”

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“We learn of a father’s love, a mother’s brokenness, disparity between brothers and sisters, yet, in the ugliest or most beautiful of exchanges, true kinship and bonds are discovered.”

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“As a feat of reclamation for the Camelot-like heyday of Black Detroit, Black Bottom Saints, like the legendary impresario at its center, makes plentiful Motown magic.

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