Children

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Brightly colored illustrations typical of Indian iconography enhance each page.”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“pen and ink artwork at its finest with storytelling to match.”

Reviewed by: 

“J.D. and the Great Barber Battle is a refreshing slice of life about a small-town kid who discovers he’s gifted in unexpected ways. It’s a fun read.”

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“A gorgeous book with an inspiring point of view: treasure your uniqueness, your relationships, and your place in the world.”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“sure to be loved by The Wimpy Kid set, a fun mix of cartoons and text with just the right amount of middle-school angst.”

Reviewed by: 

“The STEM Night Disaster delivers on teaching kids not just about science but also about a scientific mindset.”

Reviewed by: 

Just how do planes stay in the sky? How do people get inside the television? And why don’t the people on the bottom of the earth fall off?

Reviewed by: 

Marsha Is Magnetic by New York Times bestselling author Beth Ferry, of the delightful Stick and Stone fame, is a fun and lively addition to any STEM library.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

Nikki Grimes and Elizabeth Zunon, the pair who created Bedtime for Sweet Creatures, are back with a picture book that will become a bath time reading favorite for many families.

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“A brilliant job of engaging even the most reluctant reader, showing how much fun a book can be.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Dinosnores is sure to become a perennial favorite with tots, along with Boynton’s other soothing bedtime stories.”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“This is an inspired book that will motivate young readers to learn more about orchestral instruments and the wonder of the music an orchestra can make.”

Reviewed by: 

Henry’s Awful Mistake has remained a beloved bestseller for the 4–8-year-old set for the past 40 years.”

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

In Jory John and Pete Oswald’s book, The Couch Potato, we are introduced to a very charming potato who is living his dream life—all from the comfort of his couch. Why leave the cu

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“A world that kids will love!”

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“a heart-warming story full of charm and optimism; a wonderous journey that transcends the celebration of Christmas with breathtaking illustrations throughout.”

Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

No doubt, Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter had a ton of fun writing this silly book of a couple dozen or more sentences with homophones, homonyms, and tricky punctuations.

Reviewed by: 

“a sweet romp of a book . . .”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The story is simple, with a satisfyingly surprising ending.”

Reviewed by: 

Jerry Craft brings us back to eighth grade in his follow-up graphic novel to the award-winning New Kid.

Reviewed by: 

“Everything is groovy by virtue of being me.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“lively illustrations and wry humor”

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Lovers of Winnie the Pooh stories and The Wind in the Willows will find a contemporary story in the same vein.”

Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Thank You, Miyuki is a treasure.”   

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The humorous picture book makes a perfect read-aloud for young dog lovers and will certainly solicit a lively exchange among readers about their experiences with new puppies.”

Pages