Children

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The engaging illustrations, exposure to the world of Beijing, timeless themes, and sweet characters make My Beijing a worthy addition to any library. It’s a keeper.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There’s something sweet and endearing about Dear Professor Whale, the follow-up to the charming Yours Sincerely, Giraffe.

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“a heroic tale with a true female hero.”

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

What preschool has not had a Tyrannosaurus Wrecks moment? This delightful board book will immediately be a classroom and family favorite.

Reviewed by: 

“a touching, satisfying story, . . . [a] profound and insightful tale.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“for kids worried about the first day of school, this book offers something to make them feel better.”

Reviewed by: 

The intriguing title got this reviewer’s attention. The protagonist is a T. rex named Penelope, and it’s her first day of school. Penelope is nervous about going.

Reviewed by: 

This deceptively simple, wordless picture book begins in a mundane world of dull grays and tans. A young girl looks out the window from her room in an immense apartment block onto a bleak world.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Seven Bad Cats will become a bedtime favorite for its short jaunty story and its charming art.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“It is the creative and bouncy artwork that will keep readers engaged and willing to carry on to the next page.” 

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Pink Is for Boys by Robb Pearlman is a delight.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In lovely, pastel fauvist palette, Jessica Love, an actor debuting as an author/illustrator, introduces us to Julian, who loves mermaids.

Reviewed by: 

This imaginative I Can Read (Fast Fun Reads) is poised to grab the attention of distracted children who might be busy on their devices instead of sitting with a book.

Reviewed by: 

Bad news breaks and a young girl tries to make sense of it. A gray cloud slips over the family and the community. The parents are sad and distracted. “Suddenly Mom is glued to the television.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Since their first book together, Extra Yarn (2012, Balzer & Bray), Barnett and Klassen have created a series of deceptively simple, clever books.

Reviewed by: 

Open the cover on this one, and off you go to the races. Instant action, instant menace, instant character introductions in deft sketches that don’t hold things up for a second.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Five shining stars of fun!”

Author(s):
Genre(s):

Who receives handwritten letters anymore?

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

Oh, boy, oh boy, oh boy-o!

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

In her oversized new picture book newcomer Ami Shin, a recent and celebrated graduate of the Cambridge School of Illustration based in Korea, is taken with London architecture.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

From the design table of Marianne Dubuc comes a wordless picture book, The Fish and the Cat, to add to her illustrious collection of a dozen-plus picture books.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Narwhal and Jellyfish are the stars of this easy reader series by Ben Clanton.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There are more and more nonfiction picture books being published, a very welcome trend.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

It is a difficult task to dive into the sequel to a book that received universal praise and many starred reviews without having read that first acclaimed book.

Reviewed by: 

Twelve-year-old Paloma Marquez is a huge fan of the fictional detective with the excellent name of “Lulu Pennywhistle.” Lulu is a Nancy Drew stand-in, a star of an imagined children’s mystery serie

Pages