Historical Fiction

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“The mistreatment of Chinese immigrants has been swept under the rug of the myths of the Old West and American history.”

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The House of Doors is a fascinating, beautiful book.

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With a title implying vastness, and a subtitle specifying three subjects broad enough for each to fill its own book, readers can expect an epic novel with them all melded together.

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“As in every Penrose novel, the solution to these linked crimes is generated through the loyalty and insight of intelligent and caring friends.”

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“This epic quest with its strands of love and loss frames an American exploration of family, grief, honor, and deep humanity in an unforgettable fashion.”

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“He found himself lying under white sheets with very little idea of how he had gotten there. It was the morning he woke up . . . He seemed to have been there for some time.”  

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This richly textured narrative whipsaws the reader between the 14th and 21st centuries.

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graceful and eloquent and compelling.”

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"Donoghue has created a vivid world here, the confined lives of ambitious girls, some manipulative, some kind, but all keenly aware of the social strata containing them. . . .

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“The sense of place and the dynamics of a small town of that era are convincing and give us a glimpse of the history and culture of that period in South America.”

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Richard Kluger’s Hamlet’s Children is a fantastic piece of historical fiction that is so believable one would think that the story is actually true. The author’s style is unique.

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A beautiful woman with a sordid past, Arabella Yarrington began her ascent into the highest levels of society from the depths of a ramshackle cabin in Alabama where she lived with her widowed mothe

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“Berta’s murder, the public display of her mutilated body all this was meant to be a deterrent.” And it was! Yes, the people in and around the Tuscan hills were truly mortified.

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The Girl from the Papers is a well-told story and well written.”

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Alma Rosé, an Austrian violinist of Jewish descent, was a virtuoso violinist, playing throughout Europe with famous orchestras and symphonies. The famous composer Gustav Mahler was her uncle.

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“Anjum Hasan, a gifted writer who deserves wider recognition, deftly highlights the power of ideas and the peril of majoritarianism.”

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“Kelly Rimmer’s scenes in both eras are fraught with anxiety, urging the reader to keep turning the page, anxious to learn about each character’s experiences, right up to the very end.”

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“The engrossing plot, richly drawn characters, and underlying horror make this a book that lingers in the reader’s mind . . .”

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In the years immediately following WWII, France was a seriously divided country. Stephen P.

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“Sebastian has a breezy style that keeps the reader interested.”

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Kristen Loesch has written a masterly, unique, gripping novel.”

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When the Missouri Ran Red is fast-paced and action-packed, and while rich with detail the narrative never bogs down in the specifics.”

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“Each story provides a unique cast of characters and distinctly different plots, each offers a gentle portrait of people and society.

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The East Indian is a historical novel in the finest sense as it illuminates a time and place through the lives of fictional characters and imagined events with exceptional skill.”

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