Historical Fiction

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“well plotted and richly populated” 

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A Thousand Ships by Natalie Haynes, though billed as a novel, is a collection of vignettes and interrelated stories concerning various goddesses, nymphs, and mortal women connected in some

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Surely there are World War II novels that aren’t depressing, but this isn’t one of them.

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"chilling depictions of prewar naivete, the slowly tightening noose in the ghetto, and a murderous eruption of anti-Semitism in Ukraine”

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recommended for readers who prize beautiful prose and story moments that linger.”

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“A sweeping panorama of events set in motion to re-establish power in the years after the death of Julius Caesar.”

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I’m Staying Here is a simple title surrounding a profoundly moving story about ordinary people trying to live their lives as farmers, as they have for centuries. It’s 1923.

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The Children’s Train is a sympathetic, well-crafted novel filled with vacation-worthy sights and authentic experiences from an Italy that balances folk tradition with modernity.”

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This book is perfect for readers who love details.

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“The world that Mytting brings the reader into is a lost world of simplicity and harshness and a stunning beauty where almost everything is within plain sight, and yet almost nothing can be

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Critics for years have argued about whether T. S. Eliot was a closeted homosexual.

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A Lady Compromised is a complex, enthralling mystery that rivals those of Anne Perry and Agatha Christie.”

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“A rare talent and an elusive one.”

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“A lovely, gorgeously set, romantic story sure to charm lovers of historical fiction with its joie de vivre and savoir faire.”

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The Chanel Sisters is a well-researched historical fiction that depicts France’s Belle Epoch and post-war change.

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“a love story, and also as a glimpse of a small Cornish town during a tumultuous time in history, when a dramatic turn of events can change an isolated teenager into a daring young woman.”

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It seems a shame when a story begins with the death of the protagonist, but it signals the book’s trajectory and creates a story that must be told, now, lest it be forgotten.

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“Macallister’s writing is powerful, and she concocts a gripping story with strong, very human characterizations . . .”

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“Sadistic, misogynistic murders and politicized police investigations are, unfortunately, universal. They don’t need a dictatorship.”

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“an entrancing family story and a surprising adventure. Gregory’s female characters are, as always, clearly human, deeply thoughtful, and driven by their own desires and agency.

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“a novel that explores the nostalgia, loneliness, guilt, and conflicted patriotism of the (fictitious) last American who worked at the facility.”

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“A gender-flip version of Faust, and also a haunting love story that will linger.”

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“A powerful story of our earliest days as a species.”

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“with its attention to detail and swift narrative, fans of Mr.

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“The quality and clarity of Ritt's writing and delivery are truly superb. Readers will feel like they're watching a movie.”

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