Fiction

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Pony Scouts: Pony Crazy is a simple, 32-page, easy reader about horses and a girl named Meg. Meg loves everything to do with horses.

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 Imagine a pristine world out of the realm of Avatar peopled by creatures from Where The Wild Things Are and you have a glimpse into the mental imagery of Ray Shoop in his sci-fi work

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Martyrdom Street, by Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet, is an interesting and informative book about life in Iran and America during the Revolution and after the Iran-Iraq War from about 1979 to 1993

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One of the best things about not reading anything about a book until after you read the story in it is that you get to come to a story completely blind, totally unspoiled.

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High Noon, written by the New York Times bestselling author, Nora Roberts, offers her wide readership a riveting suspense story about Police Lieutenant Phoebe MacNamara’s dangerou

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Five Days Apart succeeds for many reasons, not the least of which is the author’s spot-on evocation of a specific time and place: Dublin, Ireland, in the nineties.

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Andrew Ervin’s debut, Extraordinary Renditions, is a triptych of novellas set in contemporary Budapest, a city that straddles not only the Danube but also the old world/new world divide.

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Reading the Pern books isn’t like it was when Anne McCaffrey wrote them.

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 Most Charlaine Harris fans will agree that the only thing better than a big ole glass of real Southern sweet tea is a new Sookie Stackhouse novel.  Everyone has been patiently waiting, and the wai

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Children Make Terrible Pets is a 40-page hardcover picture book about a bear cub named Lucy who, on a walk through the woods dancing and frolicking about, runs across someone admiring her

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Yann Martel writes a great pear. A mouth watering pear. In his hands, the pear is transformed into something else, something beautiful, something that can barely be contained on the page.

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Halfway through Steve Martin’s third novel, An Object of Beauty, his anti-heroine Lacey Yeager discovers she may be implicated in a major art theft involving stolen works by Vermeer and Rembrandt T

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A Murder on London Bridge is the fifth of Susanna Gregory’s Thomas Chaloner series. These stories portray post-Restoration England in all its confusion and contradiction.

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A leading Spanish postmodernist novelist paraphrases, summarizes, and cites James Joyce’s modernist “mistresspiece,” most-loved of all that Irishman’s works.

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Pobble’s Way is a picture book about a young girl named Pobble and her father as they go on an adventure through the woods in the wintertime.

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"Look,” someone said, “He’s made light.” That one simple phrase illustrates the courage and ingenuity of a young man seemingly trapped in the poverty and hopelessness of a tiny hamlet in southeaste

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Do you know a young child who freaks out when you turn on the vacuum? Does the noise make them run from the room in terror? Linda Bryan Sabin has the answer.

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“The history of the world begins in ice, and it will end in ice.” The setting of Elliot’s new fantasy series is a 19th-century England in a world trapped in a millennia-old Ice Age.

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I suppose that part of the reason I enjoyed this book is because I grew up on a farm.

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The only problem I ever have with Peter David’s unique and original Star Trek paperback series is that they appear too infrequently.

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In the current rush and abundance of vampire novels involving teenage protagonists and their dark and brooding love for the perfect immortal undead, it’s getting harder and harder to come up with s

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Torment is the much-anticipated second book to Fallen, the young adult sensation by author Lauren Kate, and the first novel in the Fallen series.

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The odious Ogre of the title is reminiscent of the one in William Steig’s original picture book, Shrek—but with his inherent ogre-ness on steroids.

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“Kill Creek is the perfect novel to read on Halloween.”

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