Science Fiction & Fantasy

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The Lost Saint is the second book of a young adult trilogy, continuing the story of The Dark Divine.

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“A sad tale’s best for winter.”
The Winter’s Tale (II.i.25), by William Shakespeare

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Language is magic. It allows us to communicate the intangible as well as the concrete; to relate history, invent story, and blend both into the sometimes maddening mix called legend.

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Nuns in outer space? Churches in virtual reality? Priests as robots? Sometimes the most unlikely pairings lead to the most interesting literary achievements.

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Sherrilyn Kenyon is a prolific writer of a number of paranormal series. Infinity: Chronicles of Nick, a teen novel, is the first in a series for young adults.

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Sometimes anthologies can be a little hit or miss with some really great stories and some that just fall flat. This is not one of those times.

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Flaming Zeppelins is a book in two parts—Zeppelins West and Flaming London—originally published as two separate books (soon to be three), and it winds up with something of a split personal

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A lobster isn’t the most likely character for a children’s book. Yet Dave Wilkinson creates a modern-day fable based on the life cycle of the crustacean in The Aspirant.

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Young adult paranormal novels have been awash in all things vampire, werewolves, and angels to name a few of the more prolific creatures.

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Perhaps one can decipher what this book is about from its title: Hunger.

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Alien invasions are nothing new to both the science fiction and fantasy genres. Books like H. G. Wells’ War of the Worlds and L.

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What is G. F. Skipworth’s The Simpering, North Dakota Literary Society?

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What is terrifying? What makes you feel the hairs on the back of your neck stand up? What makes you repeatedly look over your shoulder?

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Gateways is a collection of pieces—short stories and accolades—assembled with the sole purpose of honoring one of the greatest science fiction writers ever, Frederick Pohl, on the occasion

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 Blackwyrm Publications, February 2009 Can a world created in a work of fiction actually exist? That’s the premise of Ian Harac’s The Rainbow Connection.

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A girl, her fiddle, and a quest to save her family at what might be the end of the world in 2041—what more could one ask for in a book? Well, what about love?

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Ghostopolis is perfect proof that a graphic novel can tell as solid and detailed a story as a more traditional novel—and the fact that it’s aimed at kids and still manages this feat makes

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Mild-mannered Garet James, a New York jewelry designer and (though she always denies it) artist, has plenty to worry about.

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In the current rush and abundance of vampire novels involving teenage protagonists and their dark and brooding love for the perfect immortal undead, it’s getting harder and harder to come up with s

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(Blackwyrm Publications, July 2009)

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The genre of epic fantasy fiction is filled with characters called Zorg and Byorg and places with names like Narnia and Ambrosia and Farsala and Tigana—all of which can be quite daunting when start

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Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1973By the end of the sixties Arthur Clarke and Isaac Asimov were constantly asked who, between them, was the best.

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Jason weighed the situation for a moment, and then decided to risk jumping out of character. “Pisa isn’t in the game,” he typed. Very quickly, the voice responded. “This isn’t a game.”

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Blackwyrm Publications, May 2009 Twilight’s Jacob Black isn’t the only teenage werewolf with issues.

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