Children

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When field worker Sucoh Sucop shows up at the Nicefolks’ farm looking for work, Ever and Ima Nicefolk hire him. In payment all they can offer him is a place to sleep and meals.

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 Nobunny’s Perfect is a simply illustrated, 32-page picture book that teaches children about different kinds of behavior and about using good manners. Nobunny’s Perfect uses bunny chi

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 Duck and Cover is a deliciously cute story about a duck named Max and an interesting alligator named Harold. 

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Animal Crackers Fly the Coop is a hilariously funny book that children will love and repeat the jokes in forever.

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"Look,” someone said, “He’s made light.” That one simple phrase illustrates the courage and ingenuity of a young man seemingly trapped in the poverty and hopelessness of a tiny hamlet in southeaste

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The Mystery of Journey’s Crowne is an amazing adventure drawing game that is unique and different.

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The exuberant little Olivia the pig is back, and this time she’s taking it international. When spring vacation arrives, Olivia decides her family needs to spend a few days in Venice, Italy.

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  Illumination Arts, September 2005 In this heartwarming story, a young father welcomes his newborn daughter into his heart on the day she is born.

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Fifteen-year old Lena loves the sea. More than anything, she wants to learn to surf, but her dad, who hasn’t gone into the water for many years, prohibits it.

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 “Weekdays are for school. Saturday’s for having fun. But Sunday is the Lord’s day.

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 Illumination Arts, March 2006 Mrs. Murphy happily lives on a very fine street. Her snooty neighbors make fun of her little house and do not pay her any attention.

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 What child does not wonder what he or she will grow up to become? Dreams to Grow On will inspire as a young girl daydreams of what she will one day be.

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Do you know a young child who freaks out when you turn on the vacuum? Does the noise make them run from the room in terror? Linda Bryan Sabin has the answer.

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There are writers who, like certain songwriters, can be admired more than they can be enjoyed.

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One of Mo Willems' most wonderful talents is that he can tell a story in words that stands alone perfectly well without illustrations, and vice versa: he can tell a story in pictures that need no t

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Desdemona was born a witch. For as long as she can remember, her mom, Callida, has dragged her and their beloved feline, Devalandnefariel—who is also her mom’s familiar—all over the globe.

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Almost every family has a credit card. While it’s never a good idea to go into debt or to exceed your financial budget, the repercussions of such an action are not extreme in today’s society.

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In the sudden vast over-abundance of gloomy teen dramas in the wake of the Twilight phenomenon, it’s getting harder and harder to find one that takes an original swing at the genre.

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Eloquent Books, June 2009

A Picture Book That Encourages Children to Believe In Themselves

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When Vicki Myron, director of the Spencer Iowa Library, finds a tiny, half-frozen, orange tabby stuffed in the book return on a cold winter morning in 1988, she takes him in and nurses him to healt

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What do you find when you place a curious girl in a house full of secrets?

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When you think about slavery, pottery is probably not the first thing that comes to mind. Yet slaves helped make the functional items needed on plantations.

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Random House Books for Young Readers, May 2008

“Have you ever seen a face hidden in the bark of a tree and known that the man trapped inside wanted to hurt you?”

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This is the ninth collaboration between author Jamie Lee Curtis and illustrator Laura Cornell and it is perhaps the sweetest—but not so sweet as to give you a mouthful of cavities.

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