0–3

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Clever . . . a nice addition in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade classrooms or on a child’s bedroom bookshelf.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Continuity for parents, pleasure for kids, totally satisfies . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Kudos to Candlewick for doing a sick-kid book. There can’t be too many out there, and what sick child wouldn’t want to go to an alien world to forget about how badly he or she feels?

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“William’s Winter Nap is perfect for toddlers and preschoolers learning to share.” 

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“All three stories and the illustrations are remarkably creative and fun.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Franklin’s Flying Bookshop is an easygoing narrative about sharing the love of reading with friends.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“With captivating characters, smart text and free-flowing illustrations The Cranky Caterpillar will resonate beautifully with readers.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Artist/Illustrator Jean Jullien applies his artistry and distinct observations on routine life situations in a delightful children’s board book entitled Before & After.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Dotty’s First Book is a delightful board book for young children that stimulates the senses as they learn colors, numbers, shapes, first words, and opposites.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Claire Garralon’s Black Cat & White Cat is a short, simple walk through a world of visual contrast.

Reviewed by: 

Animal Parade makes learning fun with its stylish and tactile design as a puzzle book introducing the key concepts of bigger and smaller.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Here's the premise of The Finger Sports Game: draw a face on the tip of one or more of your long fingers, then stick it through the hole(s) to pretend you are the head of the body

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

The board book Owl Howl by Paul Friester and Philippe Goossens has been translated from the German and into English by Erica Stenfalt—and thank goodness!

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

The Bureau of Misplaced Dads is both an homage to and a clever variation on Where the Wild Things Are; an author could do a lot worse than emulate one of the most successful child

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“this coloring book falls flat.”

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“this book may be the trigger to inspire a child to learn more.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

I Don’t Like Koala delivers on its promise.”

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

You want a pet. You really want a pet.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The creators of The Day the Crayons Quit seem to be hoping readers won’t mind that they’ve colored a bit outside the lines.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . beautifully expressive and so packed with movement and joy and color that you surely, positively, absolutely wish it would never end . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Infused with loads of personality, Lots of Bots! is packed with some of the most inventive (and useful—moms take note) robots a kid could ever need. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“David A. Carter adds to Seuss’s world-building by taking the author/illustrator’s ’tude and giving it the added dimension of 3-D. And Carter has surpassed himself here.

Reviewed by: 

“Happy provides ample opportunities for extensive discussion about the expression of emotions—a true, potentially interactive delight for young readers and their caregivers.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Paige Elizabeth Darling loves her grandmother and especially loves to visit her.

Pages