Recent Reviews

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Born and raised in poverty on a plantation in Martinique, Stephanie St. Clair (Queenie) eventually arrives in New York. In the 1930s; she makes a name for herself as a racketeer and bootlegger.

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The Mitford Affair, an historical novel, begins in July 1932 and follows the aristocratic Mitford family through April 1941, as Britain recovers from World War I and reluctantly plunges in

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“Ash is such a compelling, if disturbing, character, and Hall’s writing is so eloquent that Glitterland is more substantial than the usual gay romcom.”

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“The chief function of the body is to carry the brain around,” quipped Thomas Edison, and he was, of course, right.

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“a fast-paced, engrossing read that casual readers and enthusiasts for stories related to true crime and the Mafia won’t be able to refuse.”

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“Filled with stories and gossip, the book will have strong appeal for aspiring writers and readers interested in LGBTQ life in the 1940s.”

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“Fire and Rain pretends to be military and diplomatic history—and there is some of that—but is mostly an anti-Vietnam War, anti-Nixon and Kissinger screed . .

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“paints the conflicts and stories that define the ordinary and memorable, finely etched with myriad details, that altogether reflect back on the readers’ essential humanity.”

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“With its language and momentum, the book propels a reader to the last page.”

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In her often witty and trenchant publication calling for revolution through female alliance, legal expert Diane L.

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“Iyer’s narratives—whether he’s writing about modernity or monasteries, the Dalai Lama or domestic life—brim with insights . . ."

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