Recent Reviews

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Official denial never goes out of style. In our own time, an Iraqi spokesman famously declared: "There are no American infidels in Baghdad.

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“Ronald Grigor Suny has written a massive, extensively researched biography of Josef Stalin’s early years—from his childhood days in Gori, Georgia, to the Bolshevik seizure of power in Octo

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What if Jane Austen could write meticulous diplomatic history combined with a social portrait of American and British aristocracy? The product might resemble The Daughters of Yalta by Cath

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Sylvia Plath wrote some of the best poetry of the 20th century, but her work gets less attention than the way she died. So argues Heather Clark.

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Zakaria’s grasp of the big picture and his ability to channel such a wide narrative in a very readable format should be commended.”

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By opening the curtains to offer pure vulnerability and relatable authenticity, Lenny Kravitz leaves readers feeling inspired to find our own true voice.

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This is one of those books that requires a thirst for the past glories of what life was once all about for a small-town boy who “made good” in New York City.

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“the story Follett weaves grabs you from the start and holds you in its grip till the fairy tale ending.

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“should make everyone who reads it and was born after October 1962 extremely thankful to be alive . . .”

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“makes the compelling case that secession was a much more politically complicated process than generally understood . . .”

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Midway through Eshkol Nevo’s The Last Interview, the narrator—who may or may not be Nevo himself, an uncertainty Nevo may or may not want his readers to entertain—slyly explains the ruse o

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The Grifter’s Club will appeal to political junkies who can’t get enough of the present national moment.”

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